10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 92

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Kansas Heart Hospital was hit with a ransomware attack. It paid the ransom, but then attackers tried to extort a second payment. A Critical Elevation of Privilege (EoP) vulnerability in the Qualcomm Secure Execution Environment (QSEE) affects around 60 percent of all Android devices around the world, despite being already fixed, researchers warn. Financial transaction network SWIFT called on its customers Friday to help it end a string of high-profile banking frauds perpetrated using its network. A manhunt is underway for criminals who looted millions from Japan’s cash machines nationwide in an hours-long heist, officials and reports said Monday.

Kansas Heart Hospital hit with ransomware; attackers demand two ransoms – Publication: NetworkWorld – Reporter name: Ms. Smith

Kansas Heart Hospital in Witchita was hit with ransomware last week. The ransomware attack occurred on Wednesday, and the KWCH 12 news video from Friday night said some files were still inaccessible by the hospital. Hospital President Dr. Greg Duick refused to disclose the ransom amount and the ransomware variant. He said, “I’m not at liberty because it’s an ongoing investigation, to say the actual exact amount. A small amount was made.”Yes, the hospital paid the ransom. No, the hackers didn’t decrypt the files—at least it was described as not returning “full access to the files.” Instead, the attackers asked for another ransom. This time the hospital refused to pay because it was no longer “a wise maneuver or strategy.”


Critical Vulnerability Plagues 60% of Android Devices – Publication: SecurityWeek – Reporter name: STAFF

The issue, discovered last year by Gal Beniamini, affects 75 percent of all Android devices powered by a Qualcomm processor, security firm Duo Security claims. According to Duo, around 80 percent of all Android devices have a Qualcomm processor inside, but just 25 percent of users have applied the patch, meaning that 60 percent of devices continue to be vulnerable.


SWIFT asks its customers to help it end a string of high-profile banking frauds – Publication: PCWorld – Reporter name: Peter Sayer

The SWIFT network itself is still secure, it insisted in a letter to banks and financial institutions. However, some of its customers have suffered security breaches in their own infrastructure, allowing attackers to fraudulently authorize transactions and send them over the SWIFT network, it said. SWIFT wants its customers to come forward with information about other fraudulent transfers made using their SWIFT credentials, to help it build a picture of how the attackers are working.


Manhunt After Millions Stolen in Hours-long Japan ATM Heist – Publication: Security Week – Reporter name: STAFF

Armed with fake credit card details from South Africa’s Standard Bank, the thieves hit 1,400 convenience store ATMs in a coordinated attack earlier this month. The international gang members, reportedly numbering around 100 people, each made a series of withdrawals in less than three hours, Japanese media said. Their haul totaled 1.4 billion yen ($13 million), according to the reports, with machines in Tokyo and Osaka among those targeted. It was not clear how the gang made off with the equivalent of millions of dollars so quickly as the cash machines usually limit withdrawals to 100,000 yen ($910) a day.