Tag Archives: apple

Big Data Horizons- AI, IoT Saves Lives

The Amazing Ways Coca Cola Uses AI And Big Data To Drive Success

“One of the first firms outside of IT to speak about Big Data and AI applications”

Coca-Cola has been a big player in the big-data space in recent years, and have shown many times their practical use of big data as a form to improve products. In 2012  chief big data officer, Esat Sezer, said “Social media, mobile applications, cloud computing and e-commerce are combining to give companies like Coca-Cola an unprecedented toolset to change the way they approach IT. Behind all this, big data gives you the intelligence to cap it all off.”

More recently, Greg Chambers, global director of digital innovation, has said “AI is the foundation for everything we do. We create intelligent experiences. AI is the kernel that powers that experience.”

More and more companies every day are adopting data analytics technologies and applying them to their marketing to optimize their products and create new ones, much like the case of Coca-Cola.

Disaster Response In The 21st Century: Big Data And IoT Save Lives

“Technology improves authorities ability to predict, prevent disasters”

Leveraging Big Data to predict, prepare, and prevent

Even before Harvey made landfall, organizations such as NASA, NOAA, and municipalities were using sensor data, surveillance and satellite imagery to predict not just where the storm was likely to impact, but also coordinate with first responders and law enforcement. This allowed them to identify staging locations, evacuation routes, likely flooding areas, etc., and to be prepared for the worst. Data collected from sensors and meters located throughout the region were mined and machine learning algorithms applied, in order to predict patterns and outcomes.

For example, clustering algorithms helped to determine the probability of where flooding would occur, and allowed agencies to devise a set of recommendations for evacuation routes, resource staging, and the identification of locations for shelters along these routes. The more data collected from past incidents, the more insight these agencies are forecast future behavior, using operations such as regression algorithms. This gives officials more detailed insight into potential problems before they happen, so they can allocate resources in a timely, data-driven manner. There is no doubt data mining played a critical role in the effectiveness of first responders which, in turn, led to a reduction in the loss of lives.

IoT sensors provide a huge potential platform for those that want to collect data. IoT is a fast growing market and with the right technology applied, it could provide extremely significant use cases. Not only is the data collected from these sensors helping preparations for hurricane Harvey as explained in this article, but they also have the ability to help with the aftermath. Smart IoT sensors applied across cities on their networks can alert them when certain areas are dealing with black-outs. During natural disasters like this one, some utility providers may be able to address affected areas with greater speed since they’ll be automatically notified on the statuses of effected areas.

Apple’s FaceID: Get ready for ‘big data’ to get even bigger

“Big Data cemented as trending up”

It’s not just Apple utilizing the benefits of biometric and behavioral authentication. Organizations are realizing the treasure trove of contextual insights and valuable information about customers that are available through sensor-based, ground-breaking technology.

Organizations use big data analytics to monitor the behavior of a consumer, or potential consumer. Insurance agencies can benefit from such data to assess everything from driving behavior or home settings to reduce in-home risks, to health risks based on daily habits and routines to detect anomalies. Healthcare organizations can perform remote monitoring, while the automotive industry can profile drivers via connected cars and autonomous vehicles. Even apps like Maps, Camera, Weather and Uber use location services to cater to users based on their location. Big data is getting bigger, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Transparency will be key going forward. As people often don’t fully read through privacy statements because of their length and complexity, government mandates, such as the EU’s pending General Data Protection Regulation are beginning to require organizations to present privacy statements in a “clear, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible form — using clear and plain language.”

In this article, Dutt speaks on how organizations can gain valuable insights from Apple’s new FaceID sensor. He touches on one of the most talked about issues engulfing the world of big data today, privacy. Dutt explains that if Apple does intend to collect data using the facial recognition software, they should be as transparent as possible, using easy to understand clear language to avoid any issues regarding data protections. Although the data collected from this could bring incredible insights, it would be safe for Apple to proceed with the caution and transparency.

Enjoy your read? Check out our other content here.

10Fold- Security Never Sleeps- 159

TrickerBot Trojan Targets Private Banking

“New Trojan software focuses on banking”

IBM’s X-Force security team have confirmed the existence of a new TrickBot malware program that has been attacking business banking accounts. Many incidents have been seen in the UK, Australia, and other advanced economies that have many private banks and wealth management firms.

New Mac malware spies on your web traffic

“Capable of operating on all versions of OS currently”

OSX.Dok, a new Mac malware that can spy on a victims web traffic, has been observed on all versions of OS. The virus is still capable of avoiding detection by VirusTotal and was only until recently associated with a certified Apple developer that is authenticated by Apple. Apple has since revoked the certification.

IBM warns of malware on USB drives shipped to customers

“Storwize storage systems may contain malware”

IBM has directed all customers that have purchased any USB flash drives with the Storwize installation tool to destroy the product, as they likely contain an unspecified malware code. The devices include any flash drives utilizing the V3500, V3700, and V5000 Gen 1 systems.

info potentially compromised after Victoria University data breach

“Students and faculty info at risk”

Wellington’s Victoria University appears to have been hacked, potentially leaving the sensitive information of both students and staff available to cybercriminals. The National Cyber Security Centre and other security consultants have begun to assess the extent of the damage done, but recommend all who may have been affected to immediately revise their passwords.

Enjoy your read? Check out our other content here.

10Fold- Security Never Sleeps- 134

Attackers start wiping data from CouchDB and Hadoop databases

“Ransomware groups affect data storage firms”

The inevitable attack from ransomware organizations occurred over the last week, most recently with a data wipe from the databases of MongoDB and Elasticsearch clusters. Hadoop and CouchDB are also experiencing similar attacks.

New Mac malware uses ‘ancient’ code 

“New strain targets biomedical facilities with OS X”

An antiquated strain of malware ‘Quimitchin’ has been discovered by Malwarebytes after unusual outgoing traffic from an outdated Mac operating system was spotted by an IT admin. The research team commented that “in existence, undetected, for some time.”

Billion-dollar Hacker Gang Abuses Google Services To Control Malware

“Over $1 billion stolen from banks globally”

A new Forcepoint report indicates that operators of Carbanak have implemented a new system that allows the cyber-criminals to deliver commands to computers that have suffered from the infection. The infections often spreads through unprotected Google Spreadsheets and Google Forms.

Mobile Security Gap Threatens Enterprises

“New mobile tech causing security concerns”

Two new surveys of IT experts show that malicious software is on the hotlist for researchers. A Ponemon Institute study on behalf of IBM and Arxan found that nearly 84% of IT security practitioners believe that mobile applications are vulnerable to malware threats. IoT application researchers share the concerns at 66%, although at a lower rate.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 75

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: The European Commission has filed a formal antitrust complaint against Google and has accused the company of wielding its power as the world’s leading phone software supplier to impose its search and Web programs on billions of mobile users.  A new variant of POS malware, “multigrain” has been found by FireEye – the malware targets systems that run the POS process multi.exe. Oracle has adopted the new CVSS 3.0 vulnerability rating system that has resulted in 136 flaws that were rated as high and critical. Apple warns that QuickTime for Windows PC has known flaws – the Department of Homeland Security issued a public statement urging anyone using QuickTime to uninstall the product due to Apple ceasing development and no longer supporting security updates.  

Google’s Android Targeted by EU Over Mobile Search Curbs – Publication: Bloomberg- Reporter name: Aoife White

The European Commission sent Google a formal antitrust complaint, accusing the company of striking restrictive contracts that require makers of tablets and phones to install its search and Web browser on new phones. The company also unfairly pays phone makers and telecom operators a share of advertising revenue if they agree to make Google’s search engine the default on devices, the EU said Wednesday. By sending a statement of objections, the EU is opening a new front in its antitrust battle with the Alphabet Inc. unit — paving the way for potentially huge fines and radical changes to the way the company does business. It comes a year after the EU issued a formal complaint regarding Google’s comparison-shopping service.


‘Multigrain’ variant of POS malware crops up; uses DNS tunneling to steal data – Publication: SC Magazine – Reporter name: Bradley Barth

A variant of the NewPosThings POS malware family, dubbed Multigrain, has introduced an interesting wrinkle—exfiltrating stolen payment card data from POS systems via the Domain Name System (DNS), as opposed to via HTTP or File Transfer Protocol (FTP), FireEye explained in its threat research blog on Tuesday. Because DNS is conventionally used to translate domain names into IP addresses, and not to transfer general data, the system is often overlooked by cybersecurity officials when assessing potential threats to their organizations. While HTTP or FTP traffic might be closely monitored or restricted to prevent unauthorized external queries, the DNS “is still necessary to resolve hostnames within the corporate environment and is unlikely to be blocked,” explains the FireEye blog. Consequently, DNS remains vulnerable to cyber intruders, making this tactic especially appealing to sneaky cybercriminals.


 Oracle releases 136 security patches for wide range of products – Publication: NetworkWorld – Reporter name: Lucian Constantin

Oracle has released another monster quarterly security update containing 136 fixes for flaws in a wide range of products including Oracle Database Server, E-Business Suite, Fusion Middleware, Oracle Sun Products, Java, and MySQL. The biggest change is Oracle’s adoption of the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) version 3.0, which more accurately reflects the impact of flaws than CVSS 2.0. This Oracle Critical Patch Update (CPU) has both CVSS 3.0 and CVSS 2.0 scores for vulnerabilities, providing a chance to compare how the new rating system might affect Oracle patch prioritization inside organizations. One immediately noticeable change is that there are five vulnerabilities rated with the maximum score of 10.0 based on the CVSS 2.0 scale, but none when using the CVSS 3.0 rating. At first glance, this would suggest that based on CVSS 3.0, flaws are rated as less critical, but that’s not true.


Apple Abruptly Pulls Plug On QuickTime for Windows – Publication: Forbes – Reporter name: Tony Bradley

Do you have Apple QuickTime installed on your Windows PC? It’s time to remove it. There are known flaws that can be exploited relatively easily, and Apple has confirmed that it is no longer supporting the software. The US-CERT, part of the Department of Homeland Security, recently issued a public statement urging anyone using QuickTime for Windows to uninstall the product immediately due to Apple ceasing development and therefore no longer issuing security updates. This alert stems from a recent call to action from TrendMicro, after the company’s Zero Day Initiative revealed two critical vulnerabilities: ZDI-16-241 and ZDI-16-242, affecting QuickTime for Windows.