Tag Archives: B2b PR

3 Reasons Startups Should Pay Attention to Indie…Analysts

In the enterprise software world, Gartner and Forrester command significant respect, but for many startups, their price tags ($30-50,000 or more for an annual subscription!) just don’t fit in the budget. Are startups just out of luck until the revenue starts multiplying? What if they need a quote for a press release, a white paper or some third-party credibility for prospects or investors?

The Institute of Industry Analyst Relations estimated that there were more than 13,000 industry analyst firms, so while a few large players may dominate mindshare, they really do have a lot of options. Many of these firms are what we’d call “indie” analysts – they operate in smaller shops or even independently – and focus on specific niches in the technology world. Many of them have spent time at larger analyst firms, so their experience and knowledge about how to craft messaging and design products that sells to enterprises is not to be discounted.

Here’s why it pays to turn the analyst radio station to “indie:”

Concept Validation for Prospects: Companies seeking to be disruptive (and who isn’t?) are challenging the status quo and not everyone is on the same page about the need or potential solution they’re offering. As PR professionals, we look first to the analyst community to identify someone knowledgeable in the field to confirm the problem they’re seeking to solve and their approach. Is it feasible? Will it work? Is it painful enough for businesses to the point that they’ll pay to solve it and potentially turn to a relative “unknown” to do so?  An indie analyst in that space can help answer those questions.

Once the concept behind the product or solution is confirmed, analysts can also help review and revise go-to-market plans and messaging. Since they are familiar with other companies in your space, they know where to start – up or down market – and if specific vertical industries are more likely to adopt early.

Media Reference: Larger analyst firms including Gartner, Forrester, IDC and the like, are notoriously challenging to work with to secure a quote for a press release. You’re out of luck unless you’re a paying client, and even then, all you can do is quote existing research…not very compelling. Smaller analyst firms appreciate the visibility that being quoted in a press release offers and are more likely to be available to a journalist if they’re interested in learning more about the market as they write their story. In fact, a good way to identify an indie analyst in your space is to check out articles by competitors or others in your ecosystem for what analysts are being quoted.

For early stage or disruptive companies, media will often ask for supporting details – proof points in the form of survey data, statistics, revenue, etc. This information is hard to come by, so queuing up that indie analyst is often the only thing that a startup can point to for support.

Niche Expertise: While the large firms have hundreds of analysts on staff, they have blind spots in terms of coverage areas. For example, Gartner lacks analysts with in-depth knowledge of mobile marketing and advertising solutions. If a technology sector is new, chances are the larger firms may not have someone dedicated to covering it. And if the existing analysts are tied down with their current clients and report load – they may not even have time to give to your brilliant new approach. Indie analysts can hone in quickly on new areas and aren’t beholden to a Magic Quadrant or Marketscape schedule. As a result, they can go deeper into the actual technology and offer insights that others won’t have the context to provide. When it comes to crafting a white paper or conducting specific research on a new area, this is a critical element for success.

Need help finding an indie analyst to support your marketing needs? Stay tuned for tips on finding the indie analyst of your dreams.

By Caitlin Haskins

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ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES: B2B Tech Shows Us the Future, Now

Sometimes Jumping In At The Deep End Makes You Love Swimming

My first day at 10Fold was a whirlwind of acronyms, complicated jargon, and general confusion. I heard the term edge computing for the first time ever, I sat in on a meeting where at least fifty percent of the words made no sense, and I learned that the cloud is far less fluffy than I assumed. I vividly remember thinking, “what have I gotten myself into?”

I grew up with the technological revolution; if Google were a person, it would have been in my grade in school. I scarcely remember a world before CDs were the norm, and can hardly believe that people used to go everywhere without a cell phone (because they hadn’t been invented yet) and were not only functional but content with being unreachable. Technological paradigm shifts were as much a part of my childhood as Harry Potter or making mud pies, and for that reason, the next one has always been an exciting prospect for me. Dramatic change was not only a possibility but a probability.

We are advancing more rapidly than at any other point in human history. When you consider this reality, the possibilities are endless. Click To Tweet

Having grown up in this world of tech, I went into this summer feeling as though I knew all there was to know about it. I knew what the cloud was, I knew that robots existed and that they were useful sometimes, and I knew that computers can communicate with each other. Turns out, despite technology having been there every step of the way for me, there was A LOT I had to learn.

Instead of choosing to be discouraged by everything I needed to learn, I began immersing myself in the less-publicized side of technology. Now, two months into my internship, I am more fascinated by deep, complex tech concepts than ever. I find it incredibly exciting that the future innovations that we will someday come to rely on have their foundations within the kinds of clients that 10Fold works with.

Imagine a future in which every drop of water used in agriculture is accounted for, and leaks are a thing of the past; where a smart hospital not only knows that you’re sick before you do, but how to cure you; where cars can talk to each other to not only prevent collisions but also minimize or even eliminate traffic. All of these things sound futuristic, and they are, but the coolest part about living today is that by using concepts such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things, they will all likely be possible in our lifetimes.

We are advancing more rapidly than at any other point in human history. When you consider this reality, the possibilities are endless. If someone had told my parents on the day I was born that, by the time I was in college, you could buy a pocket-sized device that can access the entirety of human knowledge, or store billions of gigabytes in the cloud, they probably would have looked at you funny. Today, not only are these technologies real, but we use them every day, and anyone can upload to the cloud; because virtually everyone has some form of internet-accessible cell phone.

Who’s to say that Back to the Future was wrong about what’s to come?

10Fold, in the multi-office format we exist in today, would have been impossible to operate only a short time ago. It’s very likely that your job would have been too. The ritualized, technology-reliant tasks we do every day would be unbelievable and fascinating to someone even only fifty years ago.

The initial pain of wading through a dictionary of terms I was totally unfamiliar with has ultimately been extremely worth it. Now, I don’t only feel more educated on the future of tech, but genuinely excited for what’s to come.

Yes, change can be scary. However, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t simultaneously incredibly exciting. Based on how far we have come in my lifetime alone, I am certain that in another twenty years, even more now-inconceivable technology will have become everyday and life-changing. There’s no reason for the exponential growth of advancement to slow, let alone stop. If you can dream it, you can do it.

By Chelsey Crowne