Tag Archives: cybersecurity

10Fold Reveals 10 Largest Breaches of 2016

Nearly Three Billion Personal Records Breached Around the World

SAN FRANCISCO, CA–(Marketwired – Jan 19, 2017) – 10Fold, a full-service B2B technology public relations agency with a specialization in cybersecurity, today announced that in 2016, more than 2.8 billion personal records were breached on social and file-sharing platforms, email providers and government databases around the world. In its second annual year-in-review, 10Fold analyzed the largest data breaches of 2016, then ranked the top 10 from greatest to least.

“If 2015 was the year of the healthcare data breach — breaches impacted nearly 40 million people — then 2016 was the year of the social media breach. Four of the top 10 breaches were social media related and impacted more than 640 million people,” said Angela Griffo, vice president of the cybersecurity practice at 10Fold. “But the biggest surprise of the year was Yahoo revealing that the information of more than 1.5 billion people had been stolen by attackers. Regardless of an attacker’s motive, any compromised information leaves users susceptible to identity theft and fraud.”

News reports about the 10 largest data breaches discovered in 2016, which are listed below, indicated that each attack affected 49 million users or more. 10Fold selected these data breaches based on independent research collected throughout 2016 and cross-referenced the information with third-party resources, including ID Theft Resource Center and Information is beautiful.

10 Largest Data Breaches of 2016:

1. Yahoo: 1.5 Billion Users — The Yahoo data breach is possibly the largest email provider data breach in history. When Yahoo first confirmed the breach in September 2016, the company revealed the breach impacted 500 million user accounts. The stolen account information included names, dates of birth, telephone numbers, passwords, and security questions and answers. In December, the company revealed an additional one billion users had been affected by the breach, bringing the grand total of affected users to 1.5 billion.

2. FriendFinder Network: 412 Million Users — In October, a number of sites in the FriendFinder Network were hacked, resulting in a data breach that affected 412 million users. According to LeakedSource, the sites affected included Adult Friend Finder, Cams and Penthouse. The breached data encompassed 20 years of user information and included user names, emails, passwords, joining dates and the date last visited. A significant amount of the user information released was the stored data of users who had previously attempted to delete their accounts. Of the total records breached and released, 15 million came from deleted accounts.

3. Myspace: 360 Million Users — In May, the prolific cyberhacker Peace sold the data of 360 million Myspace users. Released user information included names, passwords and secondary passwords. According to Time Inc., the information was from an older 2013 Myspace platform. Only those profiles that existed prior to the site’s relaunch were affected. The new site now includes stronger user account security.

4. LinkedIn: 117 Million Users — In May, it was announced that cyberhacker Peace had sold 117 million emails and encrypted passwords on the dark web for roughly $2,200.

5. VK Russia: More than 100 Million Users — In June 2016, it was reported that hacker Peace was selling the data of 100 million VK users for roughly $570. The information released contained usernames, emails, unencrypted passwords, locations and phone numbers. What’s more, the original hack occurred between 2011 to 2013.

6. Dailymotion: 87.6 Million Users — In October 2016, France-based video sharing site Dailymotion reports indicated that hackers released the usernames and emails of 87.6 million users. According to the Dailymotion blog post, the breach was due to an external security problem. While the company claimed the hack was limited — roughly 18.3 million user accounts were associated with encrypted passwords — all partners and users were still advised to reset their passwords for safekeeping. Dailymotion is the 113th most-visited website in the world.

7. Tumblr: 65 Million Users — In May, 65 million Tumblr accounts were found for sale on the dark web. A cyberhacker using the alias Peace sold the data for $150. According to security researcher Troy Hunt, the data contained email and password information.

8. DropBox: More than 60 Million Users — In August 2016, Dropbox announced that it had reset the passwords of more than 60 million users after the company discovered that an old set of Dropbox user credentials was taken. While the company suspects that the records were originally obtained in 2012, the breach was not discovered and users were not notified until 2016. The released information contained usernames and encrypted passwords. It has been reported that a senior Dropbox employee verified the released data is legitimate.

9. Philippines’ Commission on Elections: 55 Million Voters — On March 27, a hacker group posted the entire database of the Philippines’ Commission on Elections (COMELEC) online. The attackers also shared three links where the information of 55 million registered voters in the Philippines could be downloaded. The distributed data included email addresses, passport numbers and expiration dates, and fingerprint records — information that cannot be replaced or reset. Various reports suggest this breach is the biggest government-related data breach in history.

10. Turkish Citizenship Database: 49.6 Million Citizens — In April 2016, the entire Turkish citizenship database was hacked. Attackers released the personal information of 49.6 million citizens. The information released included details that are found on a standard Turkey identification card, including national identifier, name, parents’ names, gender, birthdate, city of birth and full address. According to reports, hackers validated the data by publishing details of Turkey’s president and former prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. It’s suspected that the hack was politically motivated, based on the following statement found in the released database: “Who would have imagined that backwards ideologies, cronyism and rising religious extremism in Turkey would lead to a crumbling and vulnerable technical infrastructure?”

Visit 10Fold at Security Never Sleeps During RSA
This year 10Fold is hosting its seventh annual Security Never Sleeps luncheon at RSA, which features a moderated panel discussion and audience Q&A with the cybersecurity industry’s leading executives, media and analysts. The event takes place on Wednesday, February 15 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. PST. Interested in attending this – Invitation Only – event ? Please send an email to: events@10fold.com and we’ll contact you to discuss your potential participation.

About 10Fold
10Fold is a leading North American public relations firm with regional offices in San Francisco, Pleasanton and Capistrano Beach, California. As a privately owned company founded in 1995, 10Fold provides strategic communications and content expertise to B2B organizations that specialize in networking, IT security, cloud, storage, Big Data, enterprise software, AppDev solutions, wireless, and telecom. The award-winning, highly-specialized account teams consist of multi-year public relations veterans, broadcasters and former journalists. 10Fold is a full-service firm that is widely known for its media and analyst relations, original content development, corporate messaging, social media and video production capabilities (through its division ProMotion Studios). For more information, visit www.10fold.com or follow us on Twitter (@10FoldComms) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/10FoldComms).

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Tesco Acknowledges, Apologizes for Compromise of Over 40,000 Accounts

“Cash stolen from about half of accounts accessed”

One of the biggest hacking events on a bank in United Kingdom history occurred Monday, ending with nearly 40,000 accounts compromised according to Tesco CEO Benny Higgins. “Online criminal activity” was reported by the firm over the weekend, and it was later reported that 15% of its total accounts had shown signs of fraudulent withdrawal. The bank has issued various statements on the refunding of cash thefts to date.

RCE Flaw in Bopup Found

“Enterprise IM manager has significant security breach”

Cybersecurity service firm Trustwave has found a remote code execution flaw in Bopup Communications servers, a buffer overflow that cybercriminals to exploit the application. A packet is able to be sent to a remote administration port and allows for remote execution of commands on the communication sites servers.

Controversial Cybersecurity Law Passes in China

“Watchdog organizations warn of human rights violations”

Greater control over the internet in China has many worried about implications towards businesses and individual rights. While the government added certain amendments to address these concerns, it did little to appease critics. Many corporations have announced that the law will force them out of the country, while Sophie Richardson of Human Rights Watch has declared that the requiring of local storage data is in violation with many international treaties.

Moxa Ethernet Products Found to Have Serious Issues

“Critical and moderate vulnerabilities found”

Several security flaws have been detected in Taiwan based Moxa Industrial Ethernet products, according to an advisory recently distributed by ICS-CERT. The Moxa OnCell LTE cellular gateways, AWK Wireless AP/bridge/client products, TAP railway wireless units, and WAC wireless access controllers have improper authentication and other vulnerabilities.

 

 

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A PREDATOR to Fight DNS Domain Abuse

“Intended to block malicious domain registration”

Princeton University, Google and several other institutions have been able to develop a program that will allow the detection and stop of bad actors that look to register domain names for malicious purposes. Details of the new Proactive Recognition and Elimination of Domain Abuse at Time of Registration was presented at the ACM conference last week.

“Booter” Services Going Extinct?

“Research shows potential measures that could prevent mass attacks”

Web-based contracted cyber criminals, whose services are known as “booter” or “stresser” attacks, may soon be prevented from engaging in further nefarious activities soon. German researchers have studied patterns that come about when malicious actors mass-scan the internet in attempts to find website weaknesses, or DDoS attacks.

Many Joomla Sites Hacked via Recently Patched Flaws

“Flaws could be exploited to upload a backdoor of vulnerable websites”

Fewer than 24 hours that a new patch was made available to fix serious flaws in Joomla websites, researchers had already witnessed several events in which bad actors were able to overtake privilege escalations and create access points allowing for remote execution of commands. The two most critical concerns which are now patched, CVE-2016-8869 and CVE-2016-8870, could allow for serious backdoor authorization if a hacker is well versed in their trade.

Controversial Chinese Cybersecurity Law Looks Likely to Pass

“Foreign governments and business groups eager to protest”

The Chinese Parliament has now readied its third draft of a widely criticized new law that will officially codify the sanctions it has placed over the internet within its own borders. The bill will be presented for a vote on the seventh of this month, and is met with vast opposition from many sectors of society which all claim that its inherent vagueness would allow discrimination against firms abroad on an arbitrary basis.

 

 

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Nearly Half of State Voter Registrations Attacked by Russian Hackers

“Four were cracked, leaving speculation on security of upcoming election”

As we covered in our last installment, cyber security threats from the Russians have been on the rise in this year’s voting season. We can see now that these fears may have some legitimacy, as Russian hackers were successfully able to enter several voter registration systems in the U.S.

James Comey, Director of the FBI released in his statement that “There’s no doubt that some bad actors have been poking around.” Among those attempted to be breached were what many political analysts consider to be this year’s electoral ‘swing states’, including Arizona and Illinois.

GAO Claims Issue at FDA Cybersecurity Systems

“Confidential health data potentially at risk”

Security firewalls and 80 other weaknesses were found in the Food and Drug Administration’s computer programs. This lack of proper security would allow hackers to breach confidential health information. The information was made public after the GAO, the Government Accountability Office, made 15 instructional changes to beef up security measures after an extensive audit undertaken to strengthen government agencies from potential cyber attacks.

Ransomware Spread Increases

“Weak desktop credentials biggest point of most common point of contact”

Stolen credentials for widespread remote administration application TeamViewer has been largely used to insert ransomware software ‘Surprise’, according to a research team in March. The number of attacks have increased significantly of late, adopted by more highly effective cybercriminals noting its success from their lesser-known counterparts.

The cyberattacks began long before the TeamViewer insertion via RPD servers, but started as crude password generator attacks. This recent development allows criminals to be far more effective in their theft and hacking techniques.

Tofsee Malware Now Distributed Via Spam

“Experts believe the new method is more profitable for hackers”

While malware program Tofsee has been around since 2013, its current spam distribution method is fairly new. The RIG exploit kit that recently oversaw the spread of the malware has stopped circulating, leaving spammers to employ their bots to pick up the slack. Cybercriminals often use Tofsee to engage in , including click fraud, cryptocurrency mining, DDoS attacks and sending spam.

 

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Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that’s made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. Scammers are spreading JavaScript malware disguised as a Facebook comment tag notification. The Threat Group 4127 that hit the Democratic National Committee also went after 1,800 other targets with info interesting to Russian government, says SecureWorks. The whitehats from Kaspersky Lab provided a free tool that allowed victims to decrypt their precious data without paying the ransom, which typically reaches $500 or more.

Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website – Publication: Ars Techinca – Reporter name: Dan Goodin

The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second. The DDoS attack continued for days, causing the Sucuri researchers to become curious about the origins of the attack. They soon discovered the individual devices carrying out the attack were CCTV boxes that were connected to more than 25,500 different IP addresses. The IP addresses were located in no fewer than 105 countries around the world.


Facebook comment tag malware scam targets Chrome users – Publication: SC Magazine – Reporter name: Robert Able

A user will receive a notification in their app and/or in their email about a friend tagging them in a comment and, upon clicking the link, malware is downloaded to their device, according to Hackread. Currently the malware is only targeting Chrome and one analyst on the network question and answer site Stack Exchange said the file is a typical obfuscated JavaScript malware, which targets the Windows Script Host to download the rest of the payload.


Google Accounts Of US Military, Journalists Targeted By Russian Attack Group – Publication: Dark Reading- Reporter name: Sara Peters

A Russian attack group used the Bitly URL-shortener to disguise malicious links in order to carry out spearphishing campaigns not only against the Democratic National Committee, but also against some 1,800 Google accounts of US military and government personnel and others.


New and improved CryptXXX ransomware rakes in $45,000 in 3 weeks – Publication: Ars Technica- Reporter name: Dan Goodin

Earlier this month, the developers released a new CryptXXX variant that to date still has no decryptor available. Between June 4 and June 21, according to a blog post published Monday by security firm SentinelOne, the Bitcoin address associated with the new version had received 70 bitcoins, which at current prices is valued at around $45,228. The figure doesn’t include revenue generated from previous campaigns.

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Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: A remote desktop access service called GoToMyPC was hacked this weekend and is urging all users to immediately change their passwords; The number of network infections generated by some of the most prolific forms of malware — such as Locky, Dridex, and Angler — has suddenly declined; on Friday night a hacker made off with $50 million of virtual currency after hacking the DAO (Decentralized Autonomous Organization); and a new variety of ransomware called RAA has been discovered.

GoToMyPC hit with hack attack; users need to reset passwords – Publication: PCWorld – Reporter name: Nick Mediati

According to a post published to GoToMyPC’s system status page, the remote desktop access service experienced a hack attack this weekend, and it’s now requiring all users to reset their passwords before logging in to the service.


Malware infections by Locky, Dridex, and Angler drop — but why?  – Publication: ZDNet – Reporter name: Danny Palmer

The number of network infections generated by some of the most prolific forms of malware — such as Locky, Dridex, and Angler — has suddenly declined. Instances of malware and ransomware infection have risen massively this year, but cybersecurity researchers at Symantec have noticed a huge decline in activity during June, with new infections of some forms of malicious software almost at the point where they’ve completely ceased to exist.


A $50 Million Hack Just Showed That the DAO Was All Too Human – Publication: WIRED- Reporter name: Klint Finley

Sometime in the wee hours Friday, a thief made off with $50 million of virtual currency. The victims are investors in a strange fund called the DAO, or Decentralized Autonomous Organization, who poured more than $150 million of a bitcoin-style currency called Ether into the project.


New RAA ransomware written in JavaScript discovered – Publication: SC Magazine UK – Reporter name: Doug Olenick

A new variety of ransomware called RAA has been discovered that has the somewhat unusual attribution of being coded in JavaScript instead of one of the more standard programming languages making it more effective in certain situations.

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Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Russian police have arrested 50 members of an alleged cyber-crime ring that stole more than 3 billion rubles ($45 million) from banks, the country’s biggest ever crackdown on financial hackers. Newly discovered malware ‘IronGate’ is targeting industrial control systems has the researchers who discovered it intrigued and hungry for help from the ICS community to further unravel it. Today, Yahoo became the first company to go public about NSLs it has received without needing to duke it out with the feds in court. Cisco spent $1.4 billion to acquire Jasper in February in its largest acquisition since Robbins took over as CEO. The former Sequoia-backed startup runs the largest commercial network for managing IoT devices.

Russia Detains 50 Suspected Hackers for Malware Bank Attacks – Publication: Bloomberg – Reporter name: Gavin Finch

The gang used malware to create networks of infected computers to launch 18 targeted attacks against Russian banks and state entities over the past year, the Interior Ministry said in a statement on its website.  Police were able to prevent another 2.3 billion rubles of losses, it said. The individual banks weren’t identified.


Shades Of Stuxnet Spotted In Newly Found ICS/SCADA Malware – Publication: Dark Reading – Reporter name: Kelly Jackson Higgins

FireEye researchers today detailed their findings on the so-called Irongate ICS/SCADA malware, which targets a Siemens PLC simulation (SIM) environment—not an operational one—via a man-in-the middle attack on a specific piece of custom PLC SIM code. SIM environments are where engineers test out their PLC code, which means Irongate as-is represents no actual threat to ICS operations, according to FireEye, and there’s been no sign of any attacks or attempts thus far.


Yahoo Publishes National Security Letters After FBI Drops Gag Orders – Publication: WIRED- Reporter name: Kim Zetter

Yahoo received letters in 2013 and 2015 and published redacted versions of them today. Two of the NSLs were sent to Yahoo from a special agent in the bureau’s Dallas office; the third NSL came from an agent in the bureau’s Charlotte, North Carolina office. It’s not clear whether the NSLs involve closed cases or ongoing ones for which disclosure is no longer a problem.  The letters offer no insight into the investigations behind them, and offer little else except a description of the kinds of records the FBI sought. In each case, the FBI wanted the name, address, length of service, activity logs and activity/transaction records for a specific user account.


Cisco is tracking 28 million devices on its IoT network and most of them are cars – Publication: Re/Code – Reporter name: Arik Hesseldahl

And it’s not just cars on Jasper. “It’s robots, it’s EKG machines” and other health care gear, and also robots used in manufacturing. And while the IoT is often criticized for being more hype than useful, Robbins said that Cisco has zeroed in on one significant use: Fixing things before they break. Last year Cisco teamed up with FANUC, a Japanese company building industrial robots, to keep track of how often robots in factories need maintenance. Preventive maintenance on the robots saves money by eliminating costly and unexpected downtime. “It’s turned out to be the killer app” for IoT, he said. “The savings from preventive maintenance is enough to justify the investment.”

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Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Security researchers at Sophos say that the Myspace hack could be the largest data breach of all time, easily topping the whopping 117 million LinkedIn emails and passwords that recently surfaced online from a 2012 hack. Cyber sleuths at security firm Trustwave have uncovered chatter on a Russian underground malware forum discussing a zero-day vulnerability in “every version” of Windows that is being openly sold for $90,000. A congressional committee has launched an investigation into the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s handling of the heist of more than $80 million from accounts it maintains for the central bank of Bangladesh. Amazon and Goldman Sachs have become the latest investors to back Ionic Security, as the cyber security start-up looks to expand its reach beyond large companies.

Recently confirmed Myspace hack could be the largest yet – Publication: TechCrunch – Reporter name: Sarah Perez

“We take the security and privacy of customer data and information extremely seriously—especially in an age when malicious hackers are increasingly sophisticated and breaches across all industries have become all too common,” said Myspace’s CFO Jeff Bairstow, in a statement. “Our information security and privacy teams are doing everything we can to support the Myspace team.” However, while the hack itself and the resulting data set may be old, there could still be repercussions. Because so many online users simply reuse their same passwords on multiple sites, a hacker who is able to associate a given username or email with a password could crack users’ current accounts on other sites.


Windows zero-day flaw that impacts ‘every version’ being sold on Russian forum for $90,000 – Publication: International Business Times – Reporter name: Jason Murdock

According to analysis released by researchers with SpiderLabs, a team of penetration testers and ethical hackers at Trustwave, the security flaw being sold allows attackers to upgrade any Windows user level account to an administrator account, giving them access to install malicious software, gain access to other machines and change user settings. In hacking circles, zero-day vulnerabilities are much sought-after pieces of code previously unknown to anyone that can be exploited to infiltrate or attack a computer system without warning. Previously, a number of these bugs were uncovered in Adobe Flash software after the now-infamous breach at Hacking Team.


Congress launches probe of NY Fed over handling of $80M cyberheist – Publication: CNBC- Reporter name: Eamon Javers

In a letter to New York Fed President William Dudley on Tuesday, House Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, R-Texas, asked for “all documents and communications” related to the cyberheist from the Bank of Bangladesh account. The committee also wants to know what oversight the Fed has conducted of the SWIFT system, an international electronic messaging system used by banks worldwide to authorize billions of dollars a day in money transfers.


Goldman and Amazon back cyber security start-up Ionic Security – Publication: Financial Times – Reporter name: Hannah Kuchler

Amazon is becoming an equity holder via a partnership that will also allow customers of Amazon Web Services, its fast-growing cloud data center business, to use Ionic’s technology to secure data in the cloud and on their own on-premise servers. Adam Ghetti, chief executive of Ionic Security, said the company had already seen “tremendous interest” in its partnership with AWS in Europe. Companies on the continent have become increasingly nervous about which country has sovereignty over their data since leaks by Edward Snowden, a former contractor to the US National Security Agency, exposed a mass surveillance program in 2013.

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Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: On Wednesday afternoon, LinkedIn users received an email titled “Important information about your LinkedIn account,” describing the massive 2012 hack and what the company is doing about it. A recently patched Adobe Flash Player vulnerability is being abused in a new malvertising campaign that redirects users to the Angler exploit kit (EK), Malwarebytes researchers warn. The TeslaCrypt creators called it quits recently, but unfortunately for users, there’s a new ransomware program that’s ready to take its place. Google intends to kill off passwords, as well as allow Android apps to run instantly without installing the apps first.

Finally! LinkedIn Comes Clean About Mass Data Breach – Publication: Fortune – Reporter name: Jeff John Roberts

In its email, LinkedIn claimed that it “became aware” last week that the data stolen in 2012 was being made available online. This seems a bit of stretch—the whole point of stealing data is typically to sell it online—but we’ll take them at their word. And, unlike so many other LinkedIn emails, this one is definitely useful. Oddly, the email did not include any acknowledgement or apology for the dreadful security practices used by LinkedIn in the first place. These included poor cryptography, such as failing to “salt” the data, which made it easier for hackers to unscramble users’ passwords.


Angler EK Malvertising Campaign Abuses Recent Flash Zero-Day – Publication: SecurityWeek – Reporter name: STAFF

The campaign relies on domain shadowing and professional-looking fake ads that are sent to ad networks and displayed on legitimate websites. Furthermore, the attack is highly targeted, serving the malicious code conditionally and redirecting users to the Angler EK only after performing a series of checks otherwise known as fingerprinting. While the technique is not new, there are some interesting aspects about this malvertising campaign, including the fact that Angler is abusing the CVE-2016-4117 zero-day flaw in Adobe Flash Player that was patched on May 12. Attackers abused the vulnerability via specially crafted Office documents and an exploit for this vulnerability was added to the Magnitude and Neutrino EKs as well last week.


New DMA Locker ransomware is ramping up for widespread attacks – Publication: CSO- Reporter name: Lucian Constantin

Previous DMA Locker versions did not use a command-and-control server so the RSA private key was either stored locally on the computer and could be recovered by reverse-engineering, or the same public-private key pair was used for an entire campaign. This meant that if someone paid for the private RSA key, that same key would work on multiple computers and could be shared with other victims.


Google’s Trust API: Bye-bye passwords, hello biometrics? – Publication: NetworkWorld – Reporter name: Ms. Smith

Trust API will run in the background, always keeping track of your biometrics, so it will know you are really “you” when you unlock your device. It will utilize some of the common biometric indicators you might expect, such as your face print, as well as others such as how your swipe the screen, the speed of your typing, voice patterns, your current location and even how you walk. Combined, it gives a cumulative “trust score.”

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Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Hackers appear to have made off with the equivalent of $2 million in digital currencies from Gatecoin, according to a notice posted on the exchange’s website. The cyberattack that knocked hundreds of school networks offline in Japan last week had at least one novel feature: It was allegedly instigated by a student. DMA Locker fixes known flaws and adopts new exploit kit-based distribution model.

Hackers Steal $2 Million From Bitcoin Exchange In Hong Kong, Bounty Offered To Recover Funds – Publication: Forbes – Reporter name: Robert Olson

Gatecoin is an exchange and trading platform for a range of digital currencies. It was cofounded in July 2013 by Menant, a former investment banker with Societe Generale, J.P. Morgan and BNP Paribas . Menant is also a founding member of the Bitcoin Association of Hong Kong, which seeks to foster and promote Bitcoin and its technology. “Criminals understand cryptocurrency better than almost anyone, which probably helps explain some of their success in this area,” Bryce Boland, Chief Technology for Asia Pacific at FireEye, said in an e-mail. “Unfortunately we’re going to see many more of these incidents before things get better.”


Who’s hacking schools now? The students – Publication: CNBC – Reporter name: Harriet Taylor

In the U.S., Rutgers, Arizona State University and the University of Georgia have had denial-of-service attacks in the past year. These attacks are often so effective that they completely overwhelm networks and prevent students, teachers and administrators from being able to log on. This wreaks havoc on large administrations and results in delays, for example, in class registration and final exams.


New DMA Locker ransomware is ramping up for widespread attacks – Publication: CSO – Reporter name: Lucian Constantin

Previous DMA Locker versions did not use a command-and-control server so the RSA private key was either stored locally on the computer and could be recovered by reverse-engineering, or the same public-private key pair was used for an entire campaign. This meant that if someone paid for the private RSA key, that same key would work on multiple computers and could be shared with other victims.


4 Ways to Protect Against the Very Real Threat of Ransomware – Publication: Wired – Reporter name: Kim Zetter

Any company or organization that depends on daily access to critical data—and can’t afford to lose access to it during the time it would take to respond to an attack—should be most worried about ransomware. That means banks, hospitals, Congress, police departments, and airlines and airports should all be on guard. But any large corporation or government agency is also at risk, including critical infrastructure, to a degree. Ransomware, for example, could affect the Windows systems that power and water plants use to monitor and configure operations, says Robert M. Lee, CEO at critical infrastructure security firm Dragos Security. The slightly relieving news is that ransomware, or at least the variants we know about to date, wouldn’t be able to infect the industrial control systems that actually run critical operations.