Tag Archives: IoT

Launching an IIoT Disruptor – FogHorn Systems

The FogHorn Challenge and Opportunity
FogHorn Systems approached 10Fold with a bold vision to address a major challenge standing in the way of IoT proliferation: the lack of bandwidth. In industrial and commercial IoT environments with hundreds of thousands of sensors sending multiple terabytes of data to the cloud daily, monitoring and analyzing the data in real-time seemed impossible – time-intensive and cost-prohibitive.

10Fold’s Role
We knew we had to uncover industry and media preconceptions, and enlist industry analysts in validating FogHorn’s go-to-market strategy – including the problem its solution was addressing.
We began by identifying key differentiation for FogHorn’s solution and approach, which resulted in key messages that underscored FogHorn’s significance.

Success
40+ stories – from stealth to first-to-market
22.7 M – monthly website page views from syndication of a single Tier 1 story
284.4K – social media reach (via Twitter) for FogHorn product launch
Within a year, FogHorn secured an impressive Series B round of $30M

NO FOLD ICON 15x15Wall Street Journal – FogHornTM Systems Raises $12M for Industrial Internet of Things

NO FOLD ICON 15x15Silicon Angle – Industrial group led by GE invests $12M in edge analytics startup FogHornTM

NO FOLD ICON 15x15IoT Evolution – FogHornTM Systems Secures $12 Million in Series A Funding IDG Connect – IIoT keeps pushing analytics closer to the edge

NO FOLD ICON 15x15InsideBIGDATA –  FogHornTM Announces Release of LightningTM Edge Intelligence Software for Industry IoT Solutions

NO FOLD ICON 15x15PacketPushers – FogHornTM: Real-Time Decision Making For IIoT

“I’ve partnered with 10Fold multiple times over the years because I trust their approach to delivering high-value PR strategies that support business growth. Since launching FogHorn’s Series A funding and product, Lightning ML, in 2016, they’ve helped us stand out from the IoT pack with recognition from The Wall Street Journal, Reuters, CIO and many others.”

                                  – David King, CEO FogHorn Systems

Find more insights on our work with FogHorn here.

Big Data Horizons- AI, IoT Saves Lives

The Amazing Ways Coca Cola Uses AI And Big Data To Drive Success

“One of the first firms outside of IT to speak about Big Data and AI applications”

Coca-Cola has been a big player in the big-data space in recent years, and have shown many times their practical use of big data as a form to improve products. In 2012  chief big data officer, Esat Sezer, said “Social media, mobile applications, cloud computing and e-commerce are combining to give companies like Coca-Cola an unprecedented toolset to change the way they approach IT. Behind all this, big data gives you the intelligence to cap it all off.”

More recently, Greg Chambers, global director of digital innovation, has said “AI is the foundation for everything we do. We create intelligent experiences. AI is the kernel that powers that experience.”

More and more companies every day are adopting data analytics technologies and applying them to their marketing to optimize their products and create new ones, much like the case of Coca-Cola.

Disaster Response In The 21st Century: Big Data And IoT Save Lives

“Technology improves authorities ability to predict, prevent disasters”

Leveraging Big Data to predict, prepare, and prevent

Even before Harvey made landfall, organizations such as NASA, NOAA, and municipalities were using sensor data, surveillance and satellite imagery to predict not just where the storm was likely to impact, but also coordinate with first responders and law enforcement. This allowed them to identify staging locations, evacuation routes, likely flooding areas, etc., and to be prepared for the worst. Data collected from sensors and meters located throughout the region were mined and machine learning algorithms applied, in order to predict patterns and outcomes.

For example, clustering algorithms helped to determine the probability of where flooding would occur, and allowed agencies to devise a set of recommendations for evacuation routes, resource staging, and the identification of locations for shelters along these routes. The more data collected from past incidents, the more insight these agencies are forecast future behavior, using operations such as regression algorithms. This gives officials more detailed insight into potential problems before they happen, so they can allocate resources in a timely, data-driven manner. There is no doubt data mining played a critical role in the effectiveness of first responders which, in turn, led to a reduction in the loss of lives.

IoT sensors provide a huge potential platform for those that want to collect data. IoT is a fast growing market and with the right technology applied, it could provide extremely significant use cases. Not only is the data collected from these sensors helping preparations for hurricane Harvey as explained in this article, but they also have the ability to help with the aftermath. Smart IoT sensors applied across cities on their networks can alert them when certain areas are dealing with black-outs. During natural disasters like this one, some utility providers may be able to address affected areas with greater speed since they’ll be automatically notified on the statuses of effected areas.

Apple’s FaceID: Get ready for ‘big data’ to get even bigger

“Big Data cemented as trending up”

It’s not just Apple utilizing the benefits of biometric and behavioral authentication. Organizations are realizing the treasure trove of contextual insights and valuable information about customers that are available through sensor-based, ground-breaking technology.

Organizations use big data analytics to monitor the behavior of a consumer, or potential consumer. Insurance agencies can benefit from such data to assess everything from driving behavior or home settings to reduce in-home risks, to health risks based on daily habits and routines to detect anomalies. Healthcare organizations can perform remote monitoring, while the automotive industry can profile drivers via connected cars and autonomous vehicles. Even apps like Maps, Camera, Weather and Uber use location services to cater to users based on their location. Big data is getting bigger, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Transparency will be key going forward. As people often don’t fully read through privacy statements because of their length and complexity, government mandates, such as the EU’s pending General Data Protection Regulation are beginning to require organizations to present privacy statements in a “clear, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible form — using clear and plain language.”

In this article, Dutt speaks on how organizations can gain valuable insights from Apple’s new FaceID sensor. He touches on one of the most talked about issues engulfing the world of big data today, privacy. Dutt explains that if Apple does intend to collect data using the facial recognition software, they should be as transparent as possible, using easy to understand clear language to avoid any issues regarding data protections. Although the data collected from this could bring incredible insights, it would be safe for Apple to proceed with the caution and transparency.

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Security Never Sleeps- U.S. Security, IoT Vaccines?

U.S. Government Cybersecurity Ranks 16th Out of 18 Industry Sectors

“Very small improvement over last year”

The U.S. government’s cybersecurity standing (both state and federal) is ranked 16th of 18 industry sectors in a new report published by SecurityScorecard, a firm that seeks to help business manage third- and fourth-party risk. This is a very small improvement on the nations position last year, which was 18th out of 18. This still presents a disappointing  and dangerous scenario of public sector readiness to defend systems against cybercrime and cyber espionage. The report was generated by collecting and analyzing subject data through its own data engine, ThreatMarket — which uses 10 categories such as web applications, network security, and DNS health.

Is Your Mobile Carrier Your Weakest Link?

“Mobile security more important than ever”

Now that more online services than ever now offer two-step authentication, i.e., requiring customers to complete a login using their phone or other mobile device after supplying a username and password, many services relying on your mobile devices for that second factor, there has never been more riding on the security of your mobile account. Click the link for a few tips to ensure your mobile device (or, more specifically, your mobile carrier) isn’t the most vulnerable link in your security chain.

This Mirai malware vaccine could protect insecure IoT devices

“Poorly protected IoT devices are the source of many problems”

The hazard of unsophisticated and poorly secured Internet of Things devices came to the front last year with the Mirai DDoS attack that involved nearly a million bots. Many of these devices remain a threat. Researchers have now posed an original solution to the problem: Use the vulnerability of these devices to inject a ‘white worm’ that secures the devices. It is an epidemiological approach that creates immunity with a vaccine by exposing the immune system to a weakened form of the disease.

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Security Never Sleeps- Playstation Hack, IoT Security

PlayStation Hack Affects Twitter Account

“What happened with PlayStation security”

The official PlayStation Twitter account has been subject to a security breach today, with hacking group OurMine supposedly taking responsibility. The only real evidence thus far comes from the affected account itself, with messages from the social feed allegedly coming from the group posted on the PlayStation Twitter. One also claimed that the PlayStation Network had been compromised, so any users may want to change passwords and other sensitive information.

How to improve IoT security

“Security and privacy risks always increasing”

A recent study from researchers at the technical University of Denmark, Sweden and many more, titled ‘Internet of Hackable Things’, have outlined the new privacy issues that surround the devices. Industries of particular concern include smart devices in healthcare, smart homes, and building operation faculties.

50% of Ex-Employees Can Still Access Corporate Apps

“Businesses drive risk of breaches”

Often times when employees are terminated or move to new roles elsewhere, firms forget to end access to corporate applications. Researchers at OneLogin have polled 500 IT managers to learn how they terminate staff login information and credentials in-house. Initial results trend towards administrators are not doing enough to protect against the potential breach risk from ex-employees.

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Security Never Sleeps- Scottish Parliament, IoT Regulation

Scottish Parliament targeted in ‘brute force’ cyber attack

“External sources with similar tactics to Westminster incident”

Officials have now stated that the attack on the Scottish Parliament was part of a ‘Brute Force’ cyber operation. Sir Paul Grice confirmed the attack in a message to the MSP’s and staff with statedomain email addresses, urging caution and security practices. “Robust cyber security measures” identified the attack early, and systems “remain fully operational”.

USB Ports Could Be Silently Leaking Your Personal Data To A Malicious Device

“An unfortunately convenient way to steal data”

External hard drives and USB sticks are seen as the most common and often reliable way to securely store and move data. However, an Australian research team has shown that this may not be as secure as we previously thought. Many ports that individuals plug devices in can be leaking personal data remotely, giving criminals access to sensitive information.

Cost of insider threats vs. investment in proactive education and technology

“Which is more important”

Security education is becoming incredibly more important in the increasingly digital age. Technology based defense solutions are incredibly important in preventing attacks and saving organizations significant sums of money.

Who can regulate the IoT?

“Will permeate all of life”

The Internet of Things promises to make life significantly easier, but possibly more complicated at the same time. Security concerns grow everyday over the inter-connectivity of all of these devices. This leads many experts to advocate for organized and proper regulations, with harsh penalties that apply to those who do not comply.

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10Fold Security Never Sleeps- GDPR, Law and IoT

New Trojan malware campaign sends users to fake banking site that looks just like the real thing

“False login ages steal sensitive info”

A credential stealing trickbot banking malware has been engaging in a email spam campaign that gives users a fake webpage that is nearly identical to the original. Online banking users in the US, UK, Australia, and many other countries have been affected, and this number is expected to grow as those developing it have been experimenting with EternalBlue. This was the exploit that allowed WannaCry and Petya to spread so efficiently.

Can U.S. lawmakers fix IoT security for good?

“Inter-connectivity leaves devices vulnerable”

Several U.S. Senators believe they have proposals that will aid in preventing the attacks that have plagued IoT devices in the last few years. The proposed solutions, put forward in the Internet of Things Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2017. Many expert analyses of the IoT Act reveals that it’s likely a hearty step in the right direction, but it may not be enough to stop the tide of attacks that cause major issues for many people.

How to protect personally identifiable information under GDPR

“New rules grant more rights in PII for consumers”

The GDPR goes into force May 25, 2018, impacting many firms worldwide that process data for EU citizens. Heavy fines and other penalties are due to the companies that do not enforce the more rigorous personal identifiable information (PII) regulations, often up to 4% of a firms yearly revenue. Breaches are also required to reported with three days.

Ex-NSA Analyst Raises $10 Million To Stop Hackers Destroying Power Grids

“Infrastructure targets more popular”

Part of an espionage mission to disrupt critical services began in 2013, when a U.S. dam was targeted by mercenaries hired by Iran’s revolutionary Guard Corps. This relays the importance of national cyber security, recognized by Rob Lee, who was once part of National Security Agency and currently co-founder at infrastructure-focused cybersecurity firm Dragos Inc. The firm has recently raised $10 million in Series A funding for its goals, and a recognition of the seriousness of the situation.

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New Bill Seeks Basic IoT Security Standards

“Baseline security standards for broad range of devices”

U.S. Senate legislators are working to create minimum regulations to ensure internet connected devices such as cameras,routers, and computers. The standards will also enforce holes in current cybercrime laws and was developed in direct response to the series of massive 2016 attacks using IoT devices, like the October and November Mirai attacks that put down many high profile websites for the better part of the day.

Study: Majority of retailers feel ‘vulnerable’ to a data breach

“Attacks decline, but business concern is up”

Security analyst firm 451 Research has recently released the “2017 Thales Data Threat Report, Retail Edition,” which has indicated a growing consensus among retailers that their payment systems are vulnerable to hackers. The study is based on survey answers from over 1100 senior executives globally. 52% of the companies have experienced a breach in the past, 88% fear they are vulnerable, and 19% feel ‘very’ or ‘extremely’ vulnerable.

One in three SMEs in Singapore hit by ransomware

“Nearly one fifth had to shut down businesses”

Over one third of SME’s in Singapore were attacked by ransomware attacks in 2016, and anout 20% of these had to close their doors as a result. 61% of the Singapore SME’s also had to shut down for over nine hours, about one business day, shutting down operations.

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Hack on Italy’s largest bank affects 400,000 customers

“400,000 customers put at risk”

Two security breaches have put hundreds of thousands of sensitive consumer data in jeopardy. Unicredit has stated that personal data and account numbers may have been leaked, also adding that passwords were not leaked, indicating that no unauthorized transactions took place.

Using AI to spot malware patterns

“Protecting organizations has never been more difficult and necessary”

The number of entry points and connected endpoints has only increased, showing that the bad guys are only getting smarter. A new security startup, Cylance, is using artifical intelligence to change the game and counter these criminals.

Majority of Consumers Believe IoT Needs Security Built In

“Global survey say IoT is a ‘shared responsibility'”

Many respondents to a global survey believe that consumers and manufacturers share responsibility to secure networks. Irdeto’s report shows that 90% of respondents think that security should be built in to IoT devices, but are more divided on who is responsible for implementing the systems.

Cloud-Based Email Security Systems From Microsoft And Symantec Miss Thousands Of Unsafe Emails

“Risk assessment on more than 45 million emails”

Email and data security company Mimecast has run an extensive experiment on corporate email vulnerabilities over more than a year. About 24% of the emails were marked as unsafe, with most being spam while some contained dangerous malware. That may seem like a relatively small amount, but given that all of the emails were originally classified as ‘safe’ we see a bigger problem emerge.

Shoddy data-stripping exposes firms to hack attacks

“Research suggests much vulnerability”

Many large firms have made themselves open to attacks because of inadequate data stripping on their websites. Researchers have found that as employees create documents, images, and other files, the data is uploaded to the companies website and not properly maintained.

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Undetected For Years, Stantinko Malware Infected Half a Million Systems

“Massive botnet remained under the radar for five years”

Half a millions devices have been infected by a rogue botnet, dubbed Stantinko. ESET researchers warn that affected systems can “execute anything on the infected host.” The malware has powered a huge adware campaign since at least 2012, largely targeting Russia and Ukraine, but remained hidden via code encryption until now.

Network Spreading Capabilities Added to Emotet Trojan

“Emotet Trojan spreads malware on internal networks”

Fidelis Cybersecurity researchers have identified a new variant of the Emotet Trojan that can distribute malicious programs on internal systems. Recent WannaCry and NotPetya incidents have shown us just how efficient and costly these attacks can be if they spread, increasing concerns among security researchers on greater prevalence in the future.

US Banks Targeted with Trickbot Trojan

“Necurs spreads to financial institutions”

New Emotet banking Trojan signals increasingly complex attacks on the finance industry. An official blog post had subsequently confirmed that a ‘security alert is ongoing related to the discovery, the effects of which are continuing.

Healthcare Industry Lacks Awareness of IoT Threat, Survey Says

“Three quarters of IT decision makers report that they are ‘confident’ they’re secure”

Healthcare networks are filled with IoT devices, but a study has found that the majority of IT experts claim that security systems for many of these are not adequately protected despite many believing that they are.

Kansas data breach compromised millions of Social Security numbers In 10 States

“Over 5.5 million potentially compromised”

A breach of the Kansas Department of Commerce may have given hackers access to millions of social security numbers, putting the department on the hook for credit monitoring services for all victims. The SSN’s had not been previously reported. The Kansas News Services obtained the information through an open records request.

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SambaCry Vulnerability Used to Deploy Backdoors on NAS Devices

“Running on older versions of the Samba file-sharing server”

An unknown entity is using the SambaCry security vulnerability to install a backdoor Trojan on Linux devices. According to TrendMicro, most of the attacks are tied to NAS devices which ship with the Samba server that provides file-sharing interoperability between different operating systems.

Millions of IoT Devices Possibly Affected by ‘Devil’s Ivy’ Flaw

“Could affect millions of IoT devices”

Researchers have dubbed a new security flaw that could affect many devices as “Devils Ivy.” The stack-based overflow was discovered by IoT security startup Senrio in a camera from Axis Communications.

These 10 US states have the highest rate of malware infections in the country

“Does location have a correlation to malware attacks?”

A new look at over 1 million malware infections from Enigma Software Group has found significant across all states in the U.S. New Hampshire seems to be the most at risk, with infection rates around 200% higher than than the national average.

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