Tag Archives: marketing

Running a Tweetchat: Best Practices for Success

Social media is an extremely powerful tool for any business to utilize. The use cases for it are increasing, and businesses are starting to find new and innovative ways to utilize the most popular platforms.

A Tweetchat is one of the trendiest social media campaigns one can run for their client. Short for Twitter chat, a Tweetchat is a public discussion that takes place on Twitter around a specific hashtag. These discussions are led by a moderator—an individual or company—who asks questions and facilitates the conversation.

Although a very rewarding project to run, these Tweetchats can also require a string of best practices to ensure a smooth and successful campaign.

Find Your Purpose
It is essential for you to identify the purpose of the Tweetchat before you begin. This could entail multiple planning meetings with your client beforehand to accurately identify the perfect goals. Due to the amount of planning this program can take, having a clear-purpose can make the campaign easier to organize and accomplish. Pinpointing your goals also allows you to clearly set up a sound foundation for you to build your Tweetchat atop. Set up your goals, a planned messaging approach, and more to ensure the program will run smoothly and create flexibility of your posts.

Research and Identify
Take your time to dig into research, and identify a topic or trend that is relevant to your client’s industry and audience. It’s best to try and understand what would be interesting or important from your audience’s perspective. Not only this, but it’s also important to research and identify potential attendees for your Tweetchat. Who are big influencers not only in your industry, but to your specific topic? Who do you believe would have the largest audience as well as the most social influence? Also, research the best time to hold the chat. Your chat should fall within the most active hours for your followers, which can be found by using tools like Followerwonk. Anchoring your Tweetchat around an event can easily increase engagement as well as the reach of your posts by attaching the specific hashtags.

Promote Your Tweetchat
To avoid a quiet Tweetchat, you should start promoting the chat at least two weeks ahead of the discussion. Promoting the Tweetchat across multiple social platforms helps reach a broader audience. Your client, their participating partners, the moderator and at least one person from the 10Fold team should be on the line until the Tweetchat ends. Encourage your Tweetchat’s moderator and your client’s partners to promote the Tweetchat. Providing them with content to share makes it easier for them to share details about the chat to their audiences. You can use a content planning spreadsheet to easily share your promotional content with others.

 

RELATED: A Few Best Practices for B2B Social Media

Host Your Tweetchat
When the big day comes around, it’s important to kick things off on the right foot. Make sure everyone is on the same page by dialing into a conference call line at least 15 minutes before the chat begins. The company’s representative, their participating partners, the moderator and yourself should be on the line until the Tweetchat ends. The moderator should welcome participants to the Tweetchat, and ask them to introduce themselves.

After introductions, it’s time for the questions and answers. Here are some best practices to follow:

  1. Questions and answers should use the Q1/A1 structure to make it easy for people to follow along (Note: we did not do this for the smart cities chat, and it made it slightly difficult for people to follow.
  2. Ask a question every five to 10 minutes
  3. Ask at least six questions, but no more than 12
  4. If needed, tailor the number nature and tone of your questions for your audience
  5. If more than one person is replying from your client’s account, use the respondent’s initials with their answer
  6. Retweet the best answers to keep the conversation going
  7. Allow time for participants to discuss their answers with each other

Deliver Results
Be sure to always capture your results. Within a day of the Tweetchat, use a tool like Storify to capture and organize the conversation from the Tweetchat. By archiving the chat with Storify, you can easily curate the chat and share it on other platforms to reach a broader audience. Also, don’t forget to report your results to your client within a week of the chat. These reports should highlight, key learnings, significant engagements, as well as statistics from Twitter Analytics and Tweet Reach.

Following these tips can set your Tweetchat up for success, not only making the process easier, but also improving your results!

By Nathan Zaragosa and Katrina Cameron

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A Few Best Practices for B2B Social Media

Are you like so many others who have had trouble succeeding in the social media realm? We all know that social media marketing is a must-have component in any communications strategy, but without a game plan to drive growth and engagement you are unlikely to succeed. Social media strategy is incredibly important to keep your profile front and center in your prospects’ view and in reaffirming your expertise with current customers.

Platforms
Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn should be your primary platforms in distributing content, getting your message across, and building relationships with followers. These three have been found to be the most used social sites by B2B firms, and this is where you will need to be the most competitive and most active.

Frequency and Timing
You should aim to post at least once every week day, and don’t forget weekend’s if you see that’s when your followers (or would be followers) are most active. Posts for Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for any one day do not have to be different articles. It’s fine to use one article across all social platforms per day, but do take the time to customize your actual posts – each platform has a slightly different style and of course, length for content. This will allow you to maintain your clout in your follower’s feed when they tend to be most active.

FollowerWonk offers many services, including graphs of follower data.

So how do you find out when to post for the biggest impact on growing your social profile and influence? There are many third-party applications available that are both free and paid that allow for in-depth analysis of your follower activity across different social platforms. Buffer has put together a comprehensive list of many of these applications here.

RELATED: Content Is Still the King!

Content
Social content should not just be all about you. Try to keep self-promotional content to about two days per week, or no more than around 25 per cent of your posts. This can be promoting your company’s product or services, or a particular section of your website. Posts about you at an industry event, depending how you craft them, can fit under industry news.

Thought leadership posts are another way to establish credibility and authority over the issues that your clients or prospects care about. While still self-promotional, showcasing your or your firms expertise in a niche industry or subject demonstrates proficiency in your services and give a sense of authenticity to your target audience.

Industry news articles, especially when you add commentary versus a simple retweet, share or like, should be the majority of the social content that you post. Try to keep up with trending topics and news coverage so your posts are “fresh” and relevant – basically no more than about one week old. This will allow you to stay on top of current events and move with the news cycle to maximize the attention your posts receive.

Stay tuned for more of these B2B think pieces, including information on video marketing, content curation, and much more!

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Contributions from Fran Lowe.

The Intern Experience at 10Fold

Far from just a lame B – Lister movie trying to prove that Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson are still relevant and it’s these crazy millennials that are the ones out of touch with reality, internships are actually a critical step to success in the PR.

Unfortunately, internships have kind of a bad rap. Think cliché intern and what comes to mind? Coffee? Menial grunt work? Free labor? All too often that’s exactly the case.

But not all internships are created equal. At 10Fold, we pride ourselves on our internships and really believe our program to be a cut above the rest.

So what exactly sets an internship at 10Fold apart?

It’s paid. Always.

No not in experience, or possible college credit, but in cold hard bimonthly direct deposits. Because 10Fold understands you can’t pay your landlord with a glowing letter of recommendation.

You get real world experience.

We don’t bring in interns to be coffee fetchers or kitchen cleaners; if that’s all we thought you could do we wouldn’t want to hire you in the first place. Our interns are paired directly with a senior staff member on day one and immediately get started on real work. Bad news for aspiring pencil pushers, but great news for those driven to succeed.

You’re part of the team.

Interns aren’t some expendable resource that we renew every couple of months. At 10Fold we really believe that everyone we hire is becoming part of our team and we treat them accordingly; no intern coordinator that buffers the interns from the rest of the company, no exclusive training sessions for full time hires only, no battle royal where we pit all the interns against each other in gladiatorial combat to see who among them will earn the full time position (although we can all agree that would be the best way by far).

We care about our employees, and we celebrate when our interns are successful. Literally. Every Friday, in a meeting with everyone in the company from the CEO down, we make sure to let everyone know exactly how well our interns are doing. Sometimes we even do a little cheer.

Maybe that’s why we end up hiring 70% of the interns we employ.

But hey this could all just be some corporate sales pitch right? Well listen to what intern Nathan Zaragosa has to say about his time at 10Fold:

“I personally wanted to really grow from my internship, and gain skills I didn’t have before. From the moment I came into 10Fold, I’ve been assigned real projects that make impacts such as client social media content creation, event and award searches and outreach, and most recently pitching reporters. 10Fold went as far to ask the intern team to come up with ideas to improve training in the intern program! These projects not only help you grow your skillset, but make you feel like you’re making a difference in the company.”

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Inside the Newsroom: Media Talk Tech with VentureBeat, Wired and Fast Company

Organized by PRSA

On July 26, a handful of 10Fold crew members joined the Silicon Valley and San Francisco Chapters of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) for the “Inside the Newsroom: Media Talk Tech” panel event with Fast Company, Wired, and VentureBeat.

Panelists included:

 Jason Wilson, Managing Editor, VentureBeat

 David Pierce, Senior Staff Writer, WIRED

 Sean Captain, Tech Editor, Fast Company

Below is a collection of insights, trends, and other interesting thoughts by 10Fold’s own Drew Smith, Jordan Tewell, Webbo Chen, Katrina Cameron and Kyra Tillmans following the event.

Artificial Intelligence, Digital Transformation, Virtual Reality…What’s Next?

These buzzwords are top-of-mind in today’s technology landscape, and it was no surprise that the first panel question regarded these hot topics. When Jason Wilson of VentureBeat called for a show of hands on how many audience members regularly used voice assistance, the number of hands was noticeably few. Despite all the buzz surrounding AI (i.e. in voice assistants, like Siri or Amazon Alexa) there is still a long way to go. The panelists noted that, for example, voice assistance users tend to use those features for only the things they know work well, showcasing the disparity between where the day-to-day benefits of AI voice assistance currently stand and where they could/should be.

Another salient point that David made was the different growth trajectories of augmented reality versus virtual reality. AR will improve quickly, he noted, while VR is more likely to just chug along. This might come as a surprise, as VR is typically viewed as the more “futuristic” innovation.

Trends of the Media-scape

The panelists agreed the intersection of technology and politics is a big trend on everyone’s mind. It was much easier to separate the two in the past, but now reporters who cover cyber security are often times writing about national security too. The intersection of technology and politics matter now more than ever, and we should address this when talking strategy internally and with our clients.

David made an interesting comment about video journalism. At Conde Nast (parent company of Wired), they want to ensure that video isn’t treated as a bolt-on, and they’ve started to consider video as one of the primary channels when they’re determining what goes where during their editorial meetings. Instead of slapping on video at the end of everything, reporters are putting significant thought into which platform is best – i.e. a 2,000-word feature, a photo essay, or maybe even a Snapchat video. It raises the question for PR pros to determine which avenue is best to take for which story and set expectations accordingly. Not everything will be a full-length feature story these days.

Via the Twitter hashtag #MediaTechTalk, attendees posed a question about non-Silicon Valley tech hotbeds. The panel agreed on Pittsburgh as a favorite, which wasn’t wholly surprising, because the Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Tri-State region is becoming widely known as an area of innovation. However, Fargo came as a surprise. And David made a good point of thinking about the world outside of the U.S., because all too often we have proximity bias – especially when you’re based in Silicon Valley like we are!

Tips by the Media for the Media

Sean from Fast Company continually reiterated the importance of clicks/views in judging how successful an article was. He and his editors clearly pay a lot of attention to this in a rapidly changing media landscape. Ultimately, what readers think is most important for both reporters and PR folks alike. Reporters approach stories they’re pitched by gauging whether their readers will care in order to gain as many eyeballs as possible. In tech PR, companies like to focus on news developments and its impact on the broader landscape rather than the personalities behind the tech. Instead of product launch stories, technology reporters are interested to learn about the human side of the story. As an example, David brought up a feature story on employees who were affected by Dropbox dropping AWS. The topic was very dry, and David didn’t expect it to do as well as it did. Yet, by adding in the human element, the story became one of his most popular reads to date.

As PR professionals, we can help orchestrate these stories by doing background interviews with our clients to develop a narrative that will resonate well with readers. Who is the main character in the story? It’s important to remember that if you have interesting execs, you should flesh out their bios/background and occasionally lead with that when approaching media.

As a final takeaway, all the panelists mentioned that they’d love to have more conversations with both PR folks’ clients – and the PR people themselves – that have no agenda whatsoever. Not many PR people would propose a “no agenda briefing” to a journalist – if only because that’s not likely to hook the journalist – but I’d be interested to see the results from the brave PR pro who does this.

Journalists and PR professionals agree that the media landscape is changing actively and dramatically. Events like the Media Tech Talks are a great way to engage with the media, understand their thinking and likewise share your own. A big “thank you” to PRSA for putting it together! 10Fold is looking forward to the next one.

By Kyra Tillmans

(Contributions from Drew Smith, Jordan Tewell, Webbo Chen, and Katrina Cameron)

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PR Intern’s Guide to the Galaxy: Making Relevant Media Lists

Media lists can be considered the secret weapon of the PR pro. While they’re a relatively simple tool, they’re arguably the most important to PR success. Without an updated, accurate and beat-tailored media list — sucess is hard to come by. Your reputation as a PR practitioner can also be tarnished if you constantly are pitching the wrong media contacts (you might also find your misguided email screenshotted on Twitter under #PRFails).

Media lists are used to:

  1. Secure media coverage for your client
  2. Reach a target audience
  3. Keep a history of dialogue between your client and a reporter to ensure pitches/conversations are more useful for both parties

Audience – The first thing to consider when building a media list is your client’s target audience, this will help you determine the types of publications that need to be included based on their readership. It’s also important to identify the coverage of your clients competitors. It is likely that media covering your client’s competitors will be interested in covering your client as well. A well rounded media list will include trade reporters, reporters from vertical outlets (government, healthcare, retail, etc.) and bloggers.

Keywords – When searching for the right media to include, it is crucial that you search the right keywords. In some cases, it is easy to only include the phrases categorizing your clients technology, but only if it is unique enough that your search results will bring back specific, relevant coverage. It is rarely that easy. More likely, there are instances where your client’s keywords are very generic and search results for the technology classification alone will bring back irrelevant results. Other keywords include the name of your clients competitors.

Tools – The tools most commonly used when searching for media are Google, Cision, Meltwater, IT Database. You will want to use these tools to search multiple combinations of your clients keywords as well as your clients previous coverage, and competitors previous coverage. Once you find the coverage, you will need to organize the information and create your media list using Excel.

Organize – Media lists can sometimes get very long but no matter the size, keep them organized! This ensures that you will be able to find the right contact, the first time, every time. Begin by opening an excel sheet and in the first row, place a filter on publication, first name, last name, title, email, phone number, twitter handle and a link to the reporters most relevant/timely story. Under each column, you will either fill in the information by hand or copy and paste it in from an Excel sheet generated by one of your previously used tools. Once you have all of the information filled in, check for duplicates and fill in anything that might be missing. Finding this missing information consists of research and can sometimes be time consuming.

Update – Keeping an updated media list is important, because there are many reporters who move from one publication to another and sometimes, a media contact will even change the topic that they report on, known as their beat. When you have a media list that is up to date and accurate, you avoid situations where reporters get frustrated with you because you mistakenly pitch them a story that they aren’t covering. Reporters are easier to work with if they know that you are paying attention to their current beat and reading their most current stories. Pitching the wrong media is a waste of their time, yours and the client’s.  

By Kory Buckley

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Stay ahead of the B2B mobile marketing curve; B2B mobile marketing trends

In the B2B world, marketing is more influential than it’s ever been, as it’s increasingly playing an integral role in organizations’ business strategies and technology purchasing decisions. All you need to do to understand marketing’s prominence in the B2B arena is glance at this infographic detailing the marketing technology landscape in 2017.

And as with most technology-dependent sectors, B2B marketers are realizing that in order to reach their audiences at the right place and right time, they need to have a mobile marketing strategy. Not surprisingly, it’s a trend that Google has jumped on: per Robert Allen of Smart Insights, “More than half of Google’s ad revenue is coming from mobile ads last year … it’s clear that the smartphone has become a gateway to the majority of customer attention.”

It makes sense that mobile has become one of, if not the most important platforms to connect with customers and reach an audience, but marketing for B2B presents a unique set of challenges and requirements for organizations to overcome in order to effectively reach their audiences.

Mobile has connected people not only to each other, but now to content, and this has created a new subset of marketing: content marketing. This is necessary now that over 84 percent of millennials believe their cell phone is imperative for business and not following far behind that the Gen X and baby boomer generations.

With this statement, you could only imagine how important it is for PR and marketing professionals to understand this mobile tool and tap into the creativity of using cell phones for the beneficial platform of the company.

There is new importance in the market and it is content marketing through mobile devices. This is the time to ramp your marketing budget up and apply it to the mobile sphere for your company.

Global marketing is taking new stride in importance. We can see this with the rising popularity in mobile content marketing, overall in the graph above.

With the shift from desktop to mobile visibility, marketers are recognizing that mobile is now more than half of the web traffic they are receiving on their sites. This is shocking to many as we typically think it is desktop, but putting it into perspective how often are you on your mobile device verses your desktop?

Even the giant Google is launching new mobile-first index. Although there is no set date for this, Google does plan to make the switch for their platform this year. This is mainly because they are able to identify as a company that their consumers are mostly transitioning into mobile now.

Google released three pieces of advice to follow in order to prepare your website for the mobile-first index. With more structure to come in the upcoming months.

  1. Make sure your mobile site has the content you want to rank for.
  2. Make sure structured data are on your mobile site.
  3. Make sure rel-annotations are on your mobile site.

This is imperative for marketers and PR professionals alike to understand where the readers are progressing to. It is mobile, and that is where the creativity, time, and budget should be shifting towards.

The next step to take is to update your companies mobile site. This is become more important than the desk top version. If you are not already doing this, it is essential to make this a top priority. Missing out on the curve of the mobile marketing trends will be a lost opportunity.

Today, more than half of B2B companies have mobile sites and apps. Although, the viewership is mainly on the sites verses the apps.

The benefits of going mobile is now being seen by marketers. The top metrics are being aligned with top goals and there is a 75 percent increased in audience engagement and the number of leads increasing by 72 percent additionally, a 57 percent increase in help with company sales.

To create a successful mobile platform, make sure content is relevant and creative. Additionally, emphasize that it is necessary to have content that your audience will value in the little bit of time they have when shifting through their mobile devices.

Mobile, mobile, mobile.

By Gabby Garcy

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Sources:

http://www.smartinsights.com/b2b-digital-marketing/key-b2b-marketing-trends-2016/

http://ww.iamwire.com/2017/06/top-marketing-trends-2017/152475

https://dzone.com/articles/6-mobile-commerce-trends-in-2017-infographic

http://digitalmarketingphilippines.com/the-hottest-b2b-content-marketing-trends-in-2017-infographic/

http://diginomica.com/2017/07/18/b2b-content-strategy-a-quick-twenty-point-gut-check/

http://searchengineland.com/googles-mobile-first-index-still-months-away-271851

 

 

 

 

Building Influence on Twitter

Recently we posted a few tips that covered the basics of growing your Twitter presence. This blog offers a few more ideas that will boost growth and build your influence.

Use Nuvi, TrendKite, Zignal or Another Metric Tracking Application to Guide Your Strategy
Metric applications are a nuvi snapconvenient way to track how your audience is responding to your content, so that you can focus and prioritize your efforts. These tools most importantly allow you to analyze success or failures of your posts by measuring the impact your content had with your audience from an engagement (e.g. shares, likes, retweets) perspective. Most find that visuals, recognition of a person or a team, and the occasional personal picture or thought all enhance engagement.  But, every audience is different and the only way to find out what works for your “peeps” is to measure their responses.

Evaluate Your Follower Base
The point is that bigger isn’t always better.  It’s exciting to see growth in followers, but have you taken the time to see what type of people or companies are following you?  If you gather followers that look like bots or the followers link to inactive or spam accounts, remove them from your list. While reducing the number of followers you have may sound counter-intuitive, Twitter’s news feed algorithm explains that these non-user accounts can become a significant percentage of those that see your posts – meaning your posts were not seen by nearly as many people as you had planned. This is because Twitter allows only a select few of those who follow you to see your tweets without being directly on your page, and the greater amount of inactive followers you have the greater the chance that your tweets won’t reach the engaged portion of your follower base.

Keeping it Simple
unfollowLuckily, this can be remedied quite easily. Some applications such as ‘Unfollowers for Twitter’ have specific filters that allow you to find ‘Inactive Users’, which also typically capture the vast majority of fake or spam accounts. The filter allows for varying lengths of time to find and unfollow relevant followers. There is another way to remove these accounts as well. Simply find the follower you believe is inactive and click on the gear icon by the follow button and click the block button. This will remove the follower from your followers list, and can always be undone if you feel as though you have made a mistake.

Set Up an Auto-Messaging System
message snap Short messages to followers engage users personally in your content. This step is a basic, yet important step in making new followers feel welcomed. Constructing a personalized message sent when you receive a follower gives each new user a sense of your sincere gratitude and encourages them to return to your content because of a perceived personal connection to the content creator. There are many applications you can use with your Twitter account that will automatically send a message you draft yourself if you experience large quantities of new followers, but isolated drafts to individual followers of such messages work just as well!

There is no question that Twitter has become a very important publishing mechanism for many.  Everyone from Hollywood stars to corporate giants are using the social media platform to build influence and status.  There’s so much noise, it’s hard to know how to get ahead and build your own following.  Using these three simple tips:  measure, evaluate and respond – you too can become influential on Twitter.

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Mobile Marketing to Millennials Is Racing, Are You Keeping Up?

As soon as cell phones were able to surf the web, it was not long until companies began taking advantage of what has become a fantastic marketing opportunity! Mobile Marketing is more than just a fad, it’s a marketing channel that is here to stay. A recent Smart Insights article clearly shows how big of an impact mobile marketing has, and particularly how  increasingly important it is in the Millennial market.

As smart phones get more complex and  generally way more awesome, people spend more time on them. The average consumer spends just over three and a half hours on their smart phone per day, mostly on applications. Many didn’t understand the business model behind apps like these, until the last year or two.  Now, it’s clear:  the apps are designed to support marketing. Businesses like the NBA have shown this growing trend, given their recent Snapchat use that has propelled their message and brand to over six hundred million people!

desktop-vs-mobile-most-popular-devices-2015-550x719The Smart Insights study also shows that so far in 2016, 80% of smartphone users conduct  most of their internet searches via their mobile device, a statistic growing each year especially with the Millennial base. This opens up a twenty-five billion dollar (yes, with a B) market opportunity for companies to go after, according to the same study. There is an unprecedented opportunity, since the inception of mobile marketing, in which consumers are available and capable of being exposed to new products and brands.  Being the fastest growing user group of mobile devices, Millennials are becoming the biggest targets for marketers to address – giving companies that want to reach this audience a greenfield of opportunity.

While there is plenty of opportunity, it still takes skill to reach this audience. Millennials arestarbucks environment different and they don’t behave like previous generations.  Millennials don’t respond to ‘brands’ like other generations do. Attempts of direct ‘salesy’ campaigns for their money that associate the company name or logo featured in most advertisements fall flat on the average Millennial. This generation feels much more compelled than any other to patron companies that agree with their own actions and ethics. In order to reach Millennials, firms must more effectively engage them on mobile while giving a sense of authenticity and respect for social issues or causes they support.

Starbucks cemented their increase with store location capabilities and vouchers for free food and drinks. All of these projected to mobile apps have done the company well, with 18% of transactions coming from mobile Starbucks is a leader in mobile advertising, contributing to nearly double their digital sales.

Because mobile use is growing at roughly 58% per year, the ability to effectively market your business to Millennials on mobile platforms is growing increasingly more vital in order to stay ahead of the competition.

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Are You Hip Enough to Connect with the New Generation of Customers?

In the world of business it’s easy to lose inter-generational communication, a fact that seriously hurts your ability to reach each different generation of consumers. So before you try to market your next project, keep these simple tips in mind.

Marketing 101: Know who you want to sell too! Seems like a no-brainer, right? Before you show off your new product, narrow your target audience. In marketing speak, we call this a “persona.” Essentially, it’s the demographics of your buyer. A surprising amount of companies don’t seem to take the culture of the Millennials into account in their marketing techniques. Once you know who you are selling to, saying things they can relate to, in a way that they can understand, is critical.

The Millennials are different from previous generations. They’ve grown up far more casually than their elders, and they expect to promote their individuality and are completely unafraid of delving publicly into the more taboo aspects of society that older generations avoid. Let’s look at a firm that is responding to this buyer with “persona-appropriate” images and language.

Exhibit A: McDonalds
Let’s get past your personal opinion of the food and analyze how they approach marketing now as opposed to a few years ago. McDonalds has seriously stepped up their game, moving from focusing their efforts on children to the new era of young adults that are in the best financial situation to buy their products. Knowing full well the Millennial attraction to risqué advertising techniques, McDonalds has supplied in kind.

mcD good marketing

In this photo McDonalds uses all the right triggers to market to their most likely customers. They emphasize their product, but also include a Millennial aged man and personal pronouns emphasizing their well-known “Dollar Menu” slogan. While these techniques are somewhat more conventional, the addition of the sexual pun and provocative facial expression capitalizes on the Millennial desire to approach the taboo aspects of current culture.

This new approach has worked out well for the company, which had previously been in decline due to negative stigmas involving the quality of its food. It quite handily turned around its losses, and is projected to grow by 4.5% in 2016!

So what did McDonalds teach us? First and foremost, understand who it is you’re trying to target in your marketing campaign. Nowadays this almost always includes Millennials if you are working in the tech field. Taking into account the triggers for your audience is always important too. Like McDonalds did, approaching your audiences sense of humor and preference for the more taboo garners significantly more of their attention. Sticking to these basic tenants will help you market far more effectively to your next potential customer.

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Attention Skeptics: Why B2B Marketers Should Worship the World of Mobile Marketing

By Sophorn Chhay

In the infinitely interesting words of industry experts, mobile marketing movement is inevitable, so says industry experts. We’re all moving onward together towards digital excellence, but as the march continues, there are those who are sprinting forward and others who are falling behind. Why? It all comes down to confidence in and understanding of the world of mobile marketing. Are you on board? Here’s why you should be:

Customers Demand It

The old adage “the customer is always right” is just about annoying as it is, well, correct, but it’s not so much about cowering at the feet of demanding clients as it is simply giving the people what they want. And what do the people want? In short, they want convenience. They want access to products and services that solve their problems, they want that access to be easy and intuitive, and they don’t want to have to break their stride – or their budgets – in order to get it. Check this out:

10 FOLD ICON 15x15 An impressive 90 percent of mobile users enrolled in SMS rewards programs said their participation was beneficial.

10 FOLD ICON 15x15 SMS coupons are redeemed 10 times more often than print coupons – probably because no one can remember where they put that little slip of paper they cut out from the Sunday inserts and almost everyone can remember exactly where they put their phone. Well, eventually, anyways.

10 FOLD ICON 15x15 Of all the text messages people receive, only 10 percent are considered (by the consumers themselves) to be spam.

Numbers don’t lie. There is real value in mobile marketing, and you don’t want to be the only company still protesting that you can’t see it.

SMS is Everything, More or Less

 

First, text revolutionized how we talk to our friends and loved ones. Now, it’s doing the same thing for how we communicate with businesses, both from a B2C and B2B point of view. Who wants to sit on hold for an hour just to get the answer to a simple question like “When is my order going to be delivered?” or “Are we still on for that meeting on Friday? And where is it again?” SMS is simple, efficient, immediate, and it doesn’t even have to be completely text based anymore. You can send coupons via text, links to your weekly blogs, automated information regarding scheduling updates or order confirmations – the possibilities are practically (if not literally) endless.

In fact, a text sent right after a phone conversation increases your chance for a conversion by 40%.

Text is revolutionizing customer service, too. Did you know that 52 percent of those surveyed preferred communicating with customer support via text than by email or phone? If that isn’t enough, consider that it’s a heck of a lot cheaper to set up a mobile marketing automation system than it is to staff an office full of customer service agents.

It’s the Very Best Way to Connect

Everywhere you go, there’s your cell phone. A (not-so) shocking 75 percent of people confess to bringing their phone in the bathroom with them – what other advertising method gets you so up close and personal with current and prospective customers alike? Don’t waste a golden opportunity; approach consumers from a variety of channels, be active on social media, develop killer content, and constantly encourage client feedback. It’s the only way, and it truly works.

We believe that you have something totally worthwhile to sell, and if you could sit down and have a face-to-face with every potential customer in the world, you’d probably have a decent conversion rate, but that’s simply not possible.

Don’t waste a golden opportunity; approach consumers from a variety of channels, be active on social media, develop killer content, and constantly encourage client feedback.

What you can do is reach an incredibly diverse and far-flung array of consumers wherever they happen to be, and the only way you can do that is by figuring out your winning mobile marketing strategy and joining the march forward.

What’s Next?

How do you ensure that your customer is getting the best mobile experience possible when interacting with your brand? Make sure to share them with us in the comments below. I would love to read them.

Author Biography

Sophorn Chhay

Sophorn is the marketing guy at  Trumpia, the most complete SMS software with mass text messaging, smart targeting and automation.

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10 FOLD ICON 15x15 Watch Trumpia’s 5-Minute Demo on how to execute an effective mobile marketing strategy.