Tag Archives: vulnerability

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 98

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that’s made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. Scammers are spreading JavaScript malware disguised as a Facebook comment tag notification. The Threat Group 4127 that hit the Democratic National Committee also went after 1,800 other targets with info interesting to Russian government, says SecureWorks. The whitehats from Kaspersky Lab provided a free tool that allowed victims to decrypt their precious data without paying the ransom, which typically reaches $500 or more.

Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website – Publication: Ars Techinca – Reporter name: Dan Goodin

The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second. The DDoS attack continued for days, causing the Sucuri researchers to become curious about the origins of the attack. They soon discovered the individual devices carrying out the attack were CCTV boxes that were connected to more than 25,500 different IP addresses. The IP addresses were located in no fewer than 105 countries around the world.


Facebook comment tag malware scam targets Chrome users – Publication: SC Magazine – Reporter name: Robert Able

A user will receive a notification in their app and/or in their email about a friend tagging them in a comment and, upon clicking the link, malware is downloaded to their device, according to Hackread. Currently the malware is only targeting Chrome and one analyst on the network question and answer site Stack Exchange said the file is a typical obfuscated JavaScript malware, which targets the Windows Script Host to download the rest of the payload.


Google Accounts Of US Military, Journalists Targeted By Russian Attack Group – Publication: Dark Reading- Reporter name: Sara Peters

A Russian attack group used the Bitly URL-shortener to disguise malicious links in order to carry out spearphishing campaigns not only against the Democratic National Committee, but also against some 1,800 Google accounts of US military and government personnel and others.


New and improved CryptXXX ransomware rakes in $45,000 in 3 weeks – Publication: Ars Technica- Reporter name: Dan Goodin

Earlier this month, the developers released a new CryptXXX variant that to date still has no decryptor available. Between June 4 and June 21, according to a blog post published Monday by security firm SentinelOne, the Bitcoin address associated with the new version had received 70 bitcoins, which at current prices is valued at around $45,228. The figure doesn’t include revenue generated from previous campaigns.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 97

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: A remote desktop access service called GoToMyPC was hacked this weekend and is urging all users to immediately change their passwords; The number of network infections generated by some of the most prolific forms of malware — such as Locky, Dridex, and Angler — has suddenly declined; on Friday night a hacker made off with $50 million of virtual currency after hacking the DAO (Decentralized Autonomous Organization); and a new variety of ransomware called RAA has been discovered.

GoToMyPC hit with hack attack; users need to reset passwords – Publication: PCWorld – Reporter name: Nick Mediati

According to a post published to GoToMyPC’s system status page, the remote desktop access service experienced a hack attack this weekend, and it’s now requiring all users to reset their passwords before logging in to the service.


Malware infections by Locky, Dridex, and Angler drop — but why?  – Publication: ZDNet – Reporter name: Danny Palmer

The number of network infections generated by some of the most prolific forms of malware — such as Locky, Dridex, and Angler — has suddenly declined. Instances of malware and ransomware infection have risen massively this year, but cybersecurity researchers at Symantec have noticed a huge decline in activity during June, with new infections of some forms of malicious software almost at the point where they’ve completely ceased to exist.


A $50 Million Hack Just Showed That the DAO Was All Too Human – Publication: WIRED- Reporter name: Klint Finley

Sometime in the wee hours Friday, a thief made off with $50 million of virtual currency. The victims are investors in a strange fund called the DAO, or Decentralized Autonomous Organization, who poured more than $150 million of a bitcoin-style currency called Ether into the project.


New RAA ransomware written in JavaScript discovered – Publication: SC Magazine UK – Reporter name: Doug Olenick

A new variety of ransomware called RAA has been discovered that has the somewhat unusual attribution of being coded in JavaScript instead of one of the more standard programming languages making it more effective in certain situations.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 96

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Russian police have arrested 50 members of an alleged cyber-crime ring that stole more than 3 billion rubles ($45 million) from banks, the country’s biggest ever crackdown on financial hackers. Newly discovered malware ‘IronGate’ is targeting industrial control systems has the researchers who discovered it intrigued and hungry for help from the ICS community to further unravel it. Today, Yahoo became the first company to go public about NSLs it has received without needing to duke it out with the feds in court. Cisco spent $1.4 billion to acquire Jasper in February in its largest acquisition since Robbins took over as CEO. The former Sequoia-backed startup runs the largest commercial network for managing IoT devices.

Russia Detains 50 Suspected Hackers for Malware Bank Attacks – Publication: Bloomberg – Reporter name: Gavin Finch

The gang used malware to create networks of infected computers to launch 18 targeted attacks against Russian banks and state entities over the past year, the Interior Ministry said in a statement on its website.  Police were able to prevent another 2.3 billion rubles of losses, it said. The individual banks weren’t identified.


Shades Of Stuxnet Spotted In Newly Found ICS/SCADA Malware – Publication: Dark Reading – Reporter name: Kelly Jackson Higgins

FireEye researchers today detailed their findings on the so-called Irongate ICS/SCADA malware, which targets a Siemens PLC simulation (SIM) environment—not an operational one—via a man-in-the middle attack on a specific piece of custom PLC SIM code. SIM environments are where engineers test out their PLC code, which means Irongate as-is represents no actual threat to ICS operations, according to FireEye, and there’s been no sign of any attacks or attempts thus far.


Yahoo Publishes National Security Letters After FBI Drops Gag Orders – Publication: WIRED- Reporter name: Kim Zetter

Yahoo received letters in 2013 and 2015 and published redacted versions of them today. Two of the NSLs were sent to Yahoo from a special agent in the bureau’s Dallas office; the third NSL came from an agent in the bureau’s Charlotte, North Carolina office. It’s not clear whether the NSLs involve closed cases or ongoing ones for which disclosure is no longer a problem.  The letters offer no insight into the investigations behind them, and offer little else except a description of the kinds of records the FBI sought. In each case, the FBI wanted the name, address, length of service, activity logs and activity/transaction records for a specific user account.


Cisco is tracking 28 million devices on its IoT network and most of them are cars – Publication: Re/Code – Reporter name: Arik Hesseldahl

And it’s not just cars on Jasper. “It’s robots, it’s EKG machines” and other health care gear, and also robots used in manufacturing. And while the IoT is often criticized for being more hype than useful, Robbins said that Cisco has zeroed in on one significant use: Fixing things before they break. Last year Cisco teamed up with FANUC, a Japanese company building industrial robots, to keep track of how often robots in factories need maintenance. Preventive maintenance on the robots saves money by eliminating costly and unexpected downtime. “It’s turned out to be the killer app” for IoT, he said. “The savings from preventive maintenance is enough to justify the investment.”

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 95

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Security researchers at Sophos say that the Myspace hack could be the largest data breach of all time, easily topping the whopping 117 million LinkedIn emails and passwords that recently surfaced online from a 2012 hack. Cyber sleuths at security firm Trustwave have uncovered chatter on a Russian underground malware forum discussing a zero-day vulnerability in “every version” of Windows that is being openly sold for $90,000. A congressional committee has launched an investigation into the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s handling of the heist of more than $80 million from accounts it maintains for the central bank of Bangladesh. Amazon and Goldman Sachs have become the latest investors to back Ionic Security, as the cyber security start-up looks to expand its reach beyond large companies.

Recently confirmed Myspace hack could be the largest yet – Publication: TechCrunch – Reporter name: Sarah Perez

“We take the security and privacy of customer data and information extremely seriously—especially in an age when malicious hackers are increasingly sophisticated and breaches across all industries have become all too common,” said Myspace’s CFO Jeff Bairstow, in a statement. “Our information security and privacy teams are doing everything we can to support the Myspace team.” However, while the hack itself and the resulting data set may be old, there could still be repercussions. Because so many online users simply reuse their same passwords on multiple sites, a hacker who is able to associate a given username or email with a password could crack users’ current accounts on other sites.


Windows zero-day flaw that impacts ‘every version’ being sold on Russian forum for $90,000 – Publication: International Business Times – Reporter name: Jason Murdock

According to analysis released by researchers with SpiderLabs, a team of penetration testers and ethical hackers at Trustwave, the security flaw being sold allows attackers to upgrade any Windows user level account to an administrator account, giving them access to install malicious software, gain access to other machines and change user settings. In hacking circles, zero-day vulnerabilities are much sought-after pieces of code previously unknown to anyone that can be exploited to infiltrate or attack a computer system without warning. Previously, a number of these bugs were uncovered in Adobe Flash software after the now-infamous breach at Hacking Team.


Congress launches probe of NY Fed over handling of $80M cyberheist – Publication: CNBC- Reporter name: Eamon Javers

In a letter to New York Fed President William Dudley on Tuesday, House Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, R-Texas, asked for “all documents and communications” related to the cyberheist from the Bank of Bangladesh account. The committee also wants to know what oversight the Fed has conducted of the SWIFT system, an international electronic messaging system used by banks worldwide to authorize billions of dollars a day in money transfers.


Goldman and Amazon back cyber security start-up Ionic Security – Publication: Financial Times – Reporter name: Hannah Kuchler

Amazon is becoming an equity holder via a partnership that will also allow customers of Amazon Web Services, its fast-growing cloud data center business, to use Ionic’s technology to secure data in the cloud and on their own on-premise servers. Adam Ghetti, chief executive of Ionic Security, said the company had already seen “tremendous interest” in its partnership with AWS in Europe. Companies on the continent have become increasingly nervous about which country has sovereignty over their data since leaks by Edward Snowden, a former contractor to the US National Security Agency, exposed a mass surveillance program in 2013.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 94

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: On Wednesday afternoon, LinkedIn users received an email titled “Important information about your LinkedIn account,” describing the massive 2012 hack and what the company is doing about it. A recently patched Adobe Flash Player vulnerability is being abused in a new malvertising campaign that redirects users to the Angler exploit kit (EK), Malwarebytes researchers warn. The TeslaCrypt creators called it quits recently, but unfortunately for users, there’s a new ransomware program that’s ready to take its place. Google intends to kill off passwords, as well as allow Android apps to run instantly without installing the apps first.

Finally! LinkedIn Comes Clean About Mass Data Breach – Publication: Fortune – Reporter name: Jeff John Roberts

In its email, LinkedIn claimed that it “became aware” last week that the data stolen in 2012 was being made available online. This seems a bit of stretch—the whole point of stealing data is typically to sell it online—but we’ll take them at their word. And, unlike so many other LinkedIn emails, this one is definitely useful. Oddly, the email did not include any acknowledgement or apology for the dreadful security practices used by LinkedIn in the first place. These included poor cryptography, such as failing to “salt” the data, which made it easier for hackers to unscramble users’ passwords.


Angler EK Malvertising Campaign Abuses Recent Flash Zero-Day – Publication: SecurityWeek – Reporter name: STAFF

The campaign relies on domain shadowing and professional-looking fake ads that are sent to ad networks and displayed on legitimate websites. Furthermore, the attack is highly targeted, serving the malicious code conditionally and redirecting users to the Angler EK only after performing a series of checks otherwise known as fingerprinting. While the technique is not new, there are some interesting aspects about this malvertising campaign, including the fact that Angler is abusing the CVE-2016-4117 zero-day flaw in Adobe Flash Player that was patched on May 12. Attackers abused the vulnerability via specially crafted Office documents and an exploit for this vulnerability was added to the Magnitude and Neutrino EKs as well last week.


New DMA Locker ransomware is ramping up for widespread attacks – Publication: CSO- Reporter name: Lucian Constantin

Previous DMA Locker versions did not use a command-and-control server so the RSA private key was either stored locally on the computer and could be recovered by reverse-engineering, or the same public-private key pair was used for an entire campaign. This meant that if someone paid for the private RSA key, that same key would work on multiple computers and could be shared with other victims.


Google’s Trust API: Bye-bye passwords, hello biometrics? – Publication: NetworkWorld – Reporter name: Ms. Smith

Trust API will run in the background, always keeping track of your biometrics, so it will know you are really “you” when you unlock your device. It will utilize some of the common biometric indicators you might expect, such as your face print, as well as others such as how your swipe the screen, the speed of your typing, voice patterns, your current location and even how you walk. Combined, it gives a cumulative “trust score.”

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 93

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Hackers appear to have made off with the equivalent of $2 million in digital currencies from Gatecoin, according to a notice posted on the exchange’s website. The cyberattack that knocked hundreds of school networks offline in Japan last week had at least one novel feature: It was allegedly instigated by a student. DMA Locker fixes known flaws and adopts new exploit kit-based distribution model.

Hackers Steal $2 Million From Bitcoin Exchange In Hong Kong, Bounty Offered To Recover Funds – Publication: Forbes – Reporter name: Robert Olson

Gatecoin is an exchange and trading platform for a range of digital currencies. It was cofounded in July 2013 by Menant, a former investment banker with Societe Generale, J.P. Morgan and BNP Paribas . Menant is also a founding member of the Bitcoin Association of Hong Kong, which seeks to foster and promote Bitcoin and its technology. “Criminals understand cryptocurrency better than almost anyone, which probably helps explain some of their success in this area,” Bryce Boland, Chief Technology for Asia Pacific at FireEye, said in an e-mail. “Unfortunately we’re going to see many more of these incidents before things get better.”


Who’s hacking schools now? The students – Publication: CNBC – Reporter name: Harriet Taylor

In the U.S., Rutgers, Arizona State University and the University of Georgia have had denial-of-service attacks in the past year. These attacks are often so effective that they completely overwhelm networks and prevent students, teachers and administrators from being able to log on. This wreaks havoc on large administrations and results in delays, for example, in class registration and final exams.


New DMA Locker ransomware is ramping up for widespread attacks – Publication: CSO – Reporter name: Lucian Constantin

Previous DMA Locker versions did not use a command-and-control server so the RSA private key was either stored locally on the computer and could be recovered by reverse-engineering, or the same public-private key pair was used for an entire campaign. This meant that if someone paid for the private RSA key, that same key would work on multiple computers and could be shared with other victims.


4 Ways to Protect Against the Very Real Threat of Ransomware – Publication: Wired – Reporter name: Kim Zetter

Any company or organization that depends on daily access to critical data—and can’t afford to lose access to it during the time it would take to respond to an attack—should be most worried about ransomware. That means banks, hospitals, Congress, police departments, and airlines and airports should all be on guard. But any large corporation or government agency is also at risk, including critical infrastructure, to a degree. Ransomware, for example, could affect the Windows systems that power and water plants use to monitor and configure operations, says Robert M. Lee, CEO at critical infrastructure security firm Dragos Security. The slightly relieving news is that ransomware, or at least the variants we know about to date, wouldn’t be able to infect the industrial control systems that actually run critical operations.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 92

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Kansas Heart Hospital was hit with a ransomware attack. It paid the ransom, but then attackers tried to extort a second payment. A Critical Elevation of Privilege (EoP) vulnerability in the Qualcomm Secure Execution Environment (QSEE) affects around 60 percent of all Android devices around the world, despite being already fixed, researchers warn. Financial transaction network SWIFT called on its customers Friday to help it end a string of high-profile banking frauds perpetrated using its network. A manhunt is underway for criminals who looted millions from Japan’s cash machines nationwide in an hours-long heist, officials and reports said Monday.

Kansas Heart Hospital hit with ransomware; attackers demand two ransoms – Publication: NetworkWorld – Reporter name: Ms. Smith

Kansas Heart Hospital in Witchita was hit with ransomware last week. The ransomware attack occurred on Wednesday, and the KWCH 12 news video from Friday night said some files were still inaccessible by the hospital. Hospital President Dr. Greg Duick refused to disclose the ransom amount and the ransomware variant. He said, “I’m not at liberty because it’s an ongoing investigation, to say the actual exact amount. A small amount was made.”Yes, the hospital paid the ransom. No, the hackers didn’t decrypt the files—at least it was described as not returning “full access to the files.” Instead, the attackers asked for another ransom. This time the hospital refused to pay because it was no longer “a wise maneuver or strategy.”


Critical Vulnerability Plagues 60% of Android Devices – Publication: SecurityWeek – Reporter name: STAFF

The issue, discovered last year by Gal Beniamini, affects 75 percent of all Android devices powered by a Qualcomm processor, security firm Duo Security claims. According to Duo, around 80 percent of all Android devices have a Qualcomm processor inside, but just 25 percent of users have applied the patch, meaning that 60 percent of devices continue to be vulnerable.


SWIFT asks its customers to help it end a string of high-profile banking frauds – Publication: PCWorld – Reporter name: Peter Sayer

The SWIFT network itself is still secure, it insisted in a letter to banks and financial institutions. However, some of its customers have suffered security breaches in their own infrastructure, allowing attackers to fraudulently authorize transactions and send them over the SWIFT network, it said. SWIFT wants its customers to come forward with information about other fraudulent transfers made using their SWIFT credentials, to help it build a picture of how the attackers are working.


Manhunt After Millions Stolen in Hours-long Japan ATM Heist – Publication: Security Week – Reporter name: STAFF

Armed with fake credit card details from South Africa’s Standard Bank, the thieves hit 1,400 convenience store ATMs in a coordinated attack earlier this month. The international gang members, reportedly numbering around 100 people, each made a series of withdrawals in less than three hours, Japanese media said. Their haul totaled 1.4 billion yen ($13 million), according to the reports, with machines in Tokyo and Osaka among those targeted. It was not clear how the gang made off with the equivalent of millions of dollars so quickly as the cash machines usually limit withdrawals to 100,000 yen ($910) a day.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 90

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Another data set from the 2012 LinkedIn hack, which contains over 100 million LinkedIn members’ emails and passwords, has now been released. Washington US District Judge Robert Bryan has thrown out Mozilla’s request for the security flaw’s details. Cybercriminals can call on an extensive network of specialists for “business” expertise, including people who train and recruit, launder money, and provide escrow services, according to HPE. RunKeeper announced Tuesday that it had found a bug in its Android code that resulted in the leaking of users’ location data to an unnamed third-party advertising service.

117 million LinkedIn emails and passwords from a 2012 hack just got posted online – Publication: TechCrunch- Reporter name: Sarah Perez

As you may or may not recall, given how much time has passed, hackers broke into LinkedIn’s network back in 2012, stole some 6.5 million encrypted passwords, and posted them onto a Russian hacker forum. Because the passwords were stored as unsalted SHA-1 hashes, hundreds of thousands were quickly cracked. Now, according to a new report from Motherboard, a hacker going by the name of “Peace” is trying to sell the emails and passwords of 117 million LinkedIn members on a dark web illegal marketplace for around $2,200, payable in bitcoin. In total, the data set includes 167 million accounts, but of those, only 117 million or so have both emails and encrypted passwords.


Mozilla fails to get the details on the FBI’s malware hack – Publication: Engadget – Reporter name: Mariella Moon

If you’ll recall, the FBI seized the server of a child porn website on the Tor network called Playpen in early 2015. They then used a flaw in the Tor browser, which is based on Mozilla Firefox, to install malware that pointed agents to users’ locations. They nabbed over a hundred people from that sting, including a defendant in one of Bryan’s cases. Mozilla asked for the vulnerability’s details when Bryan ordered prosecutors to disclose the flaw to that defendant’s lawyers.


Cybercriminals are launching their own HR departments – Publication: PC World- Reporter name: Grant Gross

Cybercriminals are increasingly taking a business-based approach toward their activities, with some organizations developing in-house training, disaster recovery, and other business functions, and others contracting for those services in the underground marketplace, said Shogo Cottrell, a security strategist with HPE Security. Cybercrime is maturing as a business model, he added. Some criminal hacking businesses offer 24-by-seven telephone support, others offer money-back guarantees on their products, Cottrell said.


RunKeeper acknowledges location data leak to ad service, pushes updates – Publication: Ars Technica – Reporter name: Cyrus Farivar

Like other Android apps, when the Runkeeper app is in the background, it can be awakened by the device when certain events occur (like when the device receives a Runkeeper push notification). When such events awakened the app, the bug inadvertently caused the app to send location data to the third-party service.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 88

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider: Hackers are already exploiting a new critical vulnerability in Flash Player, and Adobe Systems is still working on the patch. Brian Krebs reported that Wendy’s investigation into a credit card breach uncovered malicious software on point-of-sale systems in 5 percent of their restaurants–the source of the breach was compromised third party credentials. Symantec has reported that Internet Explorer zero-day vulnerability is being exploited to attack South Korea. PerezHilton.com was under a malvertising attack as discovered by Cyphort.

Hackers are exploiting an unpatched Flash Player vulnerability, Adobe warns – Publication: PCWorld – Reporter name: Lucian Constantin

Adobe Systems is working on a patch for a critical vulnerability in Flash Player that hackers are already exploiting in attacks. In the meantime, the company has released other security patches for Reader, Acrobat, and ColdFusion.


Wendy’s: Breach Affected 5% of Restaurants – Publication: Krebs on Security – Reporter name: Brian Krebs

Wendy’s said today that an investigation into a credit card breach at the nationwide fast-food chain uncovered malicious software on point-of-sale systems at fewer than 300 of the company’s 5,500 franchised stores. The company says the investigation into the breach is continuing, but that the malware has been removed from all affected locations.


​South Korea victim of Internet Explorer zero-day vulnerability – Publication: ZDNet- Reporter name: Asha Barbaschow

Security firm Symantec has reported that South Korea has been affected by targeted attacks that exploited an Internet Explorer zero-day vulnerability.


PerezHilton.com Hit by Malvertising – Publication: InfoSecurity Magazine – Reporter name: Tara Seals

Visitors to pop culture website PerezHilton.com have been redirected to an Angler Exploit Kit variant as a result of a malvertising attack. Researchers at Cyphort have discovered that the EK, dubbed som.barkisdesign.com, is automatically downloaded to website visitors’ computers without any interaction triggers. PerezHilton.com sees a half-million visitors per day, looking for celebrity gossip.

10Fold – Security Never Sleeps – 70

Your daily digest of “All Things Security” gathered, collected and researched by your very own 10Fold Security Practice team.

Big items to consider:  Adobe Systems released a security update for Flash Player to fix 24 critical vulnerabilities, including one that hackers have been exploiting to infect computers with ransomware over the past week. Yesterday, news broke that The National Childbirth Trust has apologized to their 15,000 new and expectant parents after their registration details were accessed in a “data breach” where email addresses, usernames and passwords were “compromised.” At this very moment in New York City, you can walk up to one of 65 futuristic kiosks, punch in an email address on your phone and instantly receive a wireless Internet connection that follows you around town. While most of the reported incidents of data being held hostage have purportedly involved a careless click by an individual on an e-mail attachment, an emerging class of criminals with slightly greater skill has turned ransomware into a sure way to cash in on just about any network intrusion.

Adobe patches actively exploited Flash Player vulnerability in 24 flaw fix – Publication: PC World – Reporter name: Lucian Constantin

Adobe Systems released a security update for Flash Player to fix 24 critical vulnerabilities, including one that hackers have been exploiting to infect computers with ransomware over the past week. The company advised users Thursday to upgrade to the newly released Flash Player on Windows and Mac and Flash Player on Linux. The Flash Player was build bundled with Google Chrome on all platforms, Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Twenty-two of the newly patched vulnerabilities can result in remote code execution on users’ computers, one can lead to a security feature bypass and one can be used to bypass the memory layout randomization mitigation that’s supposed to make exploitation harder in general.


National Childbirth Trust data breach: Industry reaction – Publication: ITProPortal – Reporter name: Sam Pudwell

Yesterday, news broke that The National Childbirth Trust has apologized to their 15,000 new and expectant parents after their registration details were accessed in a “data breach” where email addresses, usernames and passwords were “compromised.” Various industry professionals have offered their analysis and insight into yet another example of the security landscape threatening organizations all over the world. Simon Crosby, CTO and co-founder of Bromium said, “When we hear about attacks that have persisted on a compromised system for weeks or even months before detection, it is unlikely that hackers were waiting to take advantage of the breach, but far more likely that existing detection-based systems failed to properly respond to the attack.”


The tremendous ambitions behind New York City’s free WiFi – Publication: The Washington Post – Reporter name: Brian Fung

At this very moment in New York City, you can walk up to one of 65 futuristic kiosks, punch in an email address on your phone and instantly receive a wireless Internet connection that follows you around town. In a city of more than 8 million, that might not sound like much. But the WiFi kiosks, known individually as Links, offer a proof-of-concept for a wider planned network of some 7,500 hotspots across the city. Imagine if you switched them all on at once. This public connectivity could someday wind up supplementing — if not replacing — some New Yorkers’ existing Internet subscriptions, said Intersection’s chief innovation officer, Colin O’Donnell. Instead of browsing the Web through your home WiFi or 4G LTE, just pop onto the nearest Link’s WiFi signal.  The sheer volume of information gathered by this powerful network will create a massive database of information that will present attractive opportunities for hackers.


Ok, panic – newly evolved ransomware is bad news for everyone – Publication: Ars Technica – Reporter name: Sean Gallagher

While most of the reported incidents of data being held hostage have purportedly involved a careless click by an individual on an e-mail attachment, an emerging class of criminals with slightly greater skill has turned ransomware into a sure way to cash in on just about any network intrusion. And that means that there’s now a financial incentive for going after just about anything. While the payoff of going after businesses’ networks used to depend on the long play—working deep into the network, finding and packaging data, smuggling it back out—ransomware attacks don’t require that level of sophistication today. It’s now much easier to convert hacks into cash. This week’s randomware attack at Maryland’s MedStar Health hospital network is a prime example. For more than a week, 10 hospitals operated without access to their central networks, because the Windows servers controlling MedStar’s domains were locked down by the ransomware variant known as Samsam.