Security Never Sleeps- Chicago Voters, Maersk Attack

Personal data of 1.8 million Chicago voters accidentally exposed by vendor

“Roughly 1.8 million affected”

Almost 2 million Chicago voters had their phone numbers, addresses, and partial social security numbers have been left exposed on a cloud-storage website. The site was maintained by the Omaha election-services company, and the sensitive information was left vulnerable until a cybersecurity researcher discovered it earlier this week.

Ukraine central bank warns of new cyber-attack risk

“Bank warns lenders of new malware”

Today the Ukrainian central bank has issued warnings to both private and state-owned lenders of the apparent spark of a new malware program making its way through the internet. Ukrainian security forces say this program resembles the NotPetya attacks, which ended up knocking out many global systems on June 27th as it spread rapidly through corporate networks of multinational firms and suppliers in Eastern Europe.

New Android malware that spreads via text can steal victims’ credit card details from other apps

“Even apps you trust might be unsafe”

Most of us have the good sense to not enter credit card details or other financial information into sketchy looking apps or websites out of fear of theft, but hardly anyone would do a doubletake on apps like Amazon. Alas, even our favorite applications may not be a sanctuary for our sensitive information, detailed by security firm Kaspersky Labs recent blog post. The blog claims that a new malware is able to quietly steal victims data when they are put into applications, as well as spy remotely on texts and phone calls

Cyberattack cost Maersk as much as $300 million and disrupted operations for 2 weeks

“Huge costs in goods transport”

A June attack that left shipping operations crippled worldwide, even briefly shutting down the Port of Los Angeles largest cargo terminal, has cost Danish shipping firm A.P. Moller Maersk between $200-$300 million as reported by the firm earlier this week. The unprecedented severity of the attack prompted workers to coordinate improvised communications via social media networks like Twitter, WhatsApp, and even post-it notes to get goods moving from ships to the shore again.

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